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Glasses Malone Lobbies For Prisoners’ Rights [XXclusive]

Los Angeles-bred rapper Glasses Malone has exclusively announced to XXL that he will be lobbying the California State Legislature in the coming weeks for prisoners’ rights.

After watching his mother go in out of jail and recently die after being convicted of drug distribution and sentenced to twenty years at Dublin Federal Prison for women, the topic hits home for Malone.

“She was on a 20-year sentence for drugs in federal prison and died like on some health issues and it looks like it was a malpractice,” says Glasses when speaking of his mother’s death.

According to the West Coast rhyme-slinger, his mother died four years into her sentence, a death that could have been prevented. “The next day, a lot of the inmates rioted,” says GM. “It was a women’s prison, and a lot of the inmates rioted because they felt that she was [treated] unjust. People were getting out of prison and they were contacting me saying like, ‘Man, ya moms, they did ya moms kinda wrong when she died. They coulda did something about it.’”

Watching his mother pass almost two years ago (October 2009), the Cash Money artist is now on a mission to speak up and acquire rights for those currently incarcerated in the California prison system. The L.A. lyricist has teamed up with Matt Gray, a lobbyist in the state of California, to go before the Assembly and the Senate and advocate for prisoner’s [health] rights.

“He’ll actually be lobbying [the California State Legislature]. He’ll actually go walking into the Capitol together with Matt and sitting before [law makers],” says Kali Bowyer, Glasses’ publicist.

Matt Gray says: “This is something that affects people’s lives in very realistic ways every single day. Unfortunately, we have an inmate dying from actual lack of medical care for no other reasons. [It’s] about one every six days. So the longer we wait, the more people needlessly die.”

In addition to fighting for the medical rights of inmates, Glasses will also be helping bus families to California prisons as a means of transportation for families wanting to visit inmates.

“Because I came up in the streets, I watched a lot of people who didn’t get a chance to see they loved ones and stuff because they parents didn’t have money to send them or go, so I just thought that would be a really good idea,” he says.

Check back with for more information as the story develops. —Amber McKynzie

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