Contact Us
Anniversary

Anniversary - Page 2

LiL Wayne Tha Carter I
[

Lil Wayne’s Tha Carter: By The Numbers

jadakiss
[

Jadakiss Earned Eminem’s Respect With ‘Kiss Of Death’

Anyone who is a fan of hip-hop knows the legacy of Jadakiss, The LOX and D-Block. Ten years ago, on June 22, 2004, a then-29-year-old ‘Kiss released Kiss Of Death, which showcased his growth as a vivid street lyricist...

Read More

the fat boys big snake anniversary
[

Revisiting The Fat Boys’ Iconic Debut Album 30 Years Later

Whenever folks start talking about the dope talent of rap’s first “Golden Age,” The Fat Boys are often written out of the history. Granted, the trio of big Brooklyn boys, who went by the monikers Prince Markie Dee (Mark Morales), Kool Rock-Ski (Damon Wimbley) and the show-stealing Buff, a...

Read More

dj premier jeru the damaja
[

DJ Premier Remembers Jeru The Damaja’s ‘The Sun Rises In The East’ 20 Years Later

Ed Note: The following is an essay and interview with DJ Premier remembering Jeru The Damaja's classic album The Sun Rises In The East, which celebrates its 20th anniversary tomorrow, May 24...

Read More

Beastie Boys old school

“Sure Shot”


Lyric: “Timing like a clock when I rock the hip-hop/Top notch is my stock on the soapbox/I've got more rhymes than I've got grey hairs/And that's a lot because I've got my share”
Why It’s Dope: MCA was on top of his game throughout this entire album, but his reference to his own grey hairs is one that was both hilarious and reflected a passing concern at his own advancing age. We'll chalk it up as more clever than morbid, though.

[

20 Of The Best Lines From The Beastie Boys’ ‘Ill Communication’

run dmc album cover lead
[

Diggy Simmons On The 30th Anniversary Of Run-DMC’s Debut Album

In 1999, The Roots released their magnum opus to that point, Things Fall Apart, their biggest commercial and mainstream album of their careers at the time. The Philly-based crew grabbed the likes of Mos Def, Erykah Badu, Eve, Beanie Sigel, DJ Jazzy Jeff, Common and J Dilla to lend their talents to the project, creating one of hip-hop's jazziest, most musical and most cohesive albums of the past two decades.
Fifteen years later, The Roots are at the height of their fame, having just transitioned alongside Jimmy Fallon last week into their new lane as the house band for The Tonight Show, one of the most prestigious and high-profile gigs a band could achieve, coming off one of the best albums of their career in 2011's concept album undun. But it was that fourth album that put the Legendary Roots Crew on the map for good. "It doesn't seem like that much time has passed, but I guess so much has happened in my life and all of our lives since that record came out," Black Thought tells XXL. "Time flies. I feel like I've had two and a half careers since Things Fall Apart, you know?"
With the anniversary of the album coming yesterday (Feb. 23), Thought hopped on the phone with XXL to talk about some of his favorite memories from the recording of the album, the Philadelphia music scene in the late 1990s, and the mysterious case of a disappearing Mos Def. Hint: it involves fish sandwiches. Check it out. —Dan Rys (@danrys)
In 1999, The Roots released their magnum opus to that point, Things Fall Apart, their biggest commercial and mainstream album of their careers at the time. The Philly-based crew grabbed the likes of Mos Def, Erykah Badu, Eve, Beanie Sigel, DJ Jazzy Jeff, Common and J Dilla to lend their talents to the project, creating one of hip-hop's jazziest, most musical and most cohesive albums of the past two decades.

Fifteen years later, The Roots are at the height of their fame, having just transitioned alongside Jimmy Fallon last week into their new lane as the house band for The Tonight Show, one of the most prestigious and high-profile gigs a band could achieve, coming off one of the best albums of their career in 2011's concept album undun. But it was that fourth album that put the Legendary Roots Crew on the map for good. "It doesn't seem like that much time has passed, but I guess so much has happened in my life and all of our lives since that record came out," Black Thought tells XXL. "Time flies. I feel like I've had two and a half careers since Things Fall Apart, you know?"

With the anniversary of the album coming yesterday (Feb. 23), Thought hopped on the phone with XXL to talk about some of his favorite memories from the recording of the album, the Philadelphia music scene in the late 1990s, and the mysterious case of a disappearing Mos Def. Hint: it involves fish sandwiches. Check it out. —Dan Rys (@danrys)
[

Black Thought Revisits The Roots’ ‘Things Fall Apart’ 15 Years Later

Yesterday (Feb. 23) was the 15 year anniversary of Eminem's major label breakthrough, The Slim Shady LP, his second full-length project (after 1996's Infinite), the first of many iconic collaborations with Dr. Dre and the introduction of Em's infamous alter ego Slim Shady. The album—released on Dre's Aftermath Entertainment imprint under the Interscope umbrella—would go on to sell over 4 million copies in the U.S. alone, spawn the huge singles "My Name Is" and "Guilty Conscience" and set Em on the path to becoming the highest-selling hip-hop artist of all time.

But things weren't always rosy for Em back then. As a white rapper stepping into a predominantly African-American genre, he faced a backlash from a piece of the hip-hop community resistant to his brand of rap music. And for an artist immediately stepping into the mainstream spotlight, there was widespread shock, confusion and anger at what many felt were lyrics that were violent, homophobic and misogynistic, which caused some outlets to threaten to boycott the album.

That didn't faze Eminem, of course; despite the backlash, Shady persevered, and his rapid-fire, heavily-sarcastic flow as well as the album's powerful production shone through. 15 years later, Eminem's debut is regarded as one of the greatest in history, and the rapper is still one of the leading lights of the genre, even gracing XXL's current issue alongside Dre and Interscope chief Jimmy Iovine. With the anniversary marking a significant milestone in the career of Detroit's finest, XXLemailed Em's longtime manager Paul Rosenberg to get his thoughts on The Slim Shady LP, his memories of the project's creation, and how the Rap God's big break holds up a decade and a half later. —Dan Rys (@danrys)
Yesterday (Feb. 23) was the 15 year anniversary of Eminem's major label breakthrough, The Slim Shady LP, his second full-length project (after 1996's Infinite), the first of many iconic collaborations with Dr. Dre and the introduction of Em's infamous alter ego Slim Shady. The album—released on Dre's Aftermath Entertainment imprint under the Interscope umbrella—would go on to sell over 4 million copies in the U.S. alone, spawn the huge singles "My Name Is" and "Guilty Conscience" and set Em on the path to becoming the highest-selling hip-hop artist of all time.

But things weren't always rosy for Em back then. As a white rapper stepping into a predominantly African-American genre, he faced a backlash from a piece of the hip-hop community resistant to his brand of rap music. And for an artist immediately stepping into the mainstream spotlight, there was widespread shock, confusion and anger at what many felt were lyrics that were violent, homophobic and misogynistic, which caused some outlets to threaten to boycott the album.

That didn't faze Eminem, of course; despite the backlash, Shady persevered, and his rapid-fire, heavily-sarcastic flow as well as the album's powerful production shone through. 15 years later, Eminem's debut is regarded as one of the greatest in history, and the rapper is still one of the leading lights of the genre, even gracing XXL's current issue alongside Dre and Interscope chief Jimmy Iovine. With the anniversary marking a significant milestone in the career of Detroit's finest, XXLemailed Em's longtime manager Paul Rosenberg to get his thoughts on The Slim Shady LP, his memories of the project's creation, and how the Rap God's big break holds up a decade and a half later. —Dan Rys (@danrys)
[

Eminem Manager Paul Rosenberg On The 15 Year Anniversary Of ‘The Slim Shady LP’

Roc-A-Fella Records
Roc-A-Fella Records
[

Dame Dash Looks Back On Kanye West’s ‘College Dropout’ 10 Years Later

On Feb. 10, 2004, hip-hop was introduced to Kanye West, the rapper, with his debut album College Dropout. The singles from this album were soulful and awe-inspiring...

Read More

OutKast-XXL-Magazine
[

OutKast Revisits ‘Speakerboxxx/The Love Below’ – XXL Issue 151

Holy Grail

Words Dan Rys

Editor’s Note: This story originally appeared in the October/November 2013 issue of XXL Magazine.

When OutKast’s Speakerboxxx/The Love Below dropped 10 years ago on September 23, 2003, no one could have ever predicted the enormity of its success...

Read More

It appears that you already have an account created within our VIP network of sites on . To keep your personal information safe, we need to verify that it's really you. To activate your account, please confirm your password. When you have confirmed your password, you will be able to log in through Facebook on both sites.

Forgot your password?

It appears that you already have an account on this site associated with . To connect your existing account just click on the account activation button below. You will maintain your existing VIP profile. After you do this, you will be able to always log in to http://www.xxlmag.com using your original account information.

Please fill out the information below to help us provide you a better experience.

(Forgot your password?)

Not a member? Sign up here

Sign up for XXL Mag quickly by connecting your Facebook account. It's just as secure and no password to remember!