BLOG: Powerful

Sometimes it makes me bananas trying to explain how powerful hip-hop would be if we all understood the part we play. DJ, artist, journalist, photographer, director and let us not ever forget the fan; the lover of hip-hop music. Really when it comes down to it, we all have so much power, but in the end it is not just the lover of hip-hop music, but the actual consumer of the genre that has the power to propel the art in to any direction they wish.

Now you may ask, “What the hell is she talking about?” I’m speaking of the all-mighty dollar. That dollar speaks a million words and more to the manufacturer of the so-called product. PRODUCT meaning something that can be sold and put to good use. GOOD meaning able to be used. If one produces a product and people purchase it that is a sign to the creator of the project that they have done a good thing. If one creates a product that does not sell, then the creator either gives up, or goes back to the drawing board and comes up with a better product to get better results. CUT TO THE CHASE…as long as people with money buy things that are unable to be used (in other words…not good…bad…suckie) they will send a message to the creator of those works they should continue to make that thing. CUTTING TO THE CHASE EVEN MORE…Don’t buy garbage!!!!!

And for some of us it may not be buying garbage that leaves us powerless, but listening to BS on the radio, with the mentality, “This song will soon be over.” Unfortunately, not changing the station sends a message to radio they are playing what we want to hear. Which then sends a message to advertisers that they should spend their money with that station that plays that BS that those people like to hear.

And if I’ve hit a nerve because you feel as though I’m speaking directly to you, I probably am. But what the hell we all do it. I was singing “Superman that Hoe” through no fault of my own. I had heard the damn song on the radio so many times a part of my brain had been abducted without me even knowing. Not to say by any means that song is garbage, but I’m a grown-ass-woman of 37-years and “Superman That Hoe” should not be coming out of my mouth. My goddaughter would think I was crazy if she caught me singing that…lol.

As of now, in hip-hop, we stand united but separate. We are without a doubt the most powerless powerful people I know. It’s really time to use our power. Show them what we want from hip-hop by supporting the groups and individuals that are really trying to give us something different and innovative. Please do not separate yourself from the artist, as if you as a fan are on one side of the line and the artist on another. Demand the best from hip-hop and watch the results it brings. I must admit, you showed these labels it’s only become a single selling market because you all as consumers said, “the album ain’t hot enough.” Now get busy and make hip-hop the genre YOU want it to be. After all hip-hop belongs to those who are strong, determined and unwilling to let go. Because it is more than a thing; hip-hop cannot be owned by anyone, however “ENTYONE” (yes I meant to spell it like that) can be a part of hip-hop!!!! Do not separate yourself from the artist, as if you, as a fan are on one side of the line and the artist on another. Demand the best from hip-hop and watch the results it brings. —MC Lyte

  • Silly Willy

    “We are without a doubt the most powerless powerful people I know.”

    Now, that’s a hip hop quotable, Ms Lyte. You’re totally on point!!!

    • Silly Willy

      Damn you, Ms Lyte !!!

      Now whenever I hear “Supaman Dat Hoe”, I’ll be thinking of your 37 years old fine self. I’m gonna end up liking that trash……

  • http://Pierzy11@gmail.com Pierzy

    I couldn’t agree more. The people that have the most power (listen to the radio, watch videos and buy albums) are the ones that fail to realize the potential they hold…

  • P. Harris

    Damn, this was a good blog…

    This blog, it is the absolute truth. I don’t even have much more to say then that. Ms. Lyte with all the respect I had for you before these blogs, I honestly have gained more. It’s about time somebody pointed out the real and offered a solution to what most hip hoppers call a problem.

    It’s in our hands…

  • http://www.myspace.com/atlatino404 El Tico Loco

    “we stand united but separate”,”powerless powerful” sounds like we are minorities. But this post was on some real shit, a lot of real emcees been sayin this for years, but none have been in powerful positions enough to be heard and when they do get in those positions they flake out. Maybe you can walk in those board meetings one day let them know on our behalf, you’re smart and got a pretty face to represent for us in there too so u get thru the door.

  • http://www.twitter.com/diva741 Victoria Page

    I wholeheartedly agree.

    This is why I have chosen to fill my iPod with the music I like to listen to and I have just stopped listening to the radio all together. I will only pour my hard earned money into music that makes sense.

  • Escobar9300

    Great blog. Glad to see a blog from an intelligent woman as opposed to the garbage that Shakur was putting out.

  • $ykotic

    Well ain’t this the truth! Right at Slaughterhouse week!

    It(SH) may not be the album of the year, but buying it shows these other labels they have to find other artists in the same fold because they are in demand.

    Even with the Jeezy cover. He’s an established artist already. Of course he would get first dibs. But we shouted for SH to get the cover so hard, Vanessa even had to come down and explain. That’s the power of us.

    So let’s fight for the music together instead of fighting each other.

    And band together against the idiots & e-thug supremacists who loathe us.

    PEACE

  • http://www.jamal7mile.blogspot.com Jamal7Mile

    Good drop, Lyte!

    I’ve been supporting the good stuff forever. Good beats, good rhymes, that’s all I ask for. If it’s wack, it shouldn’t be sucessful. If it’s dope, it should sell well. Unfortunately, that’s not what’s happening and that’s frustrating to me, the fan. Redman should be all over the airwaves, IMO, and I’m mad that he isn’t.

    The majority-consumer does not look like me. They aren’t 35 like me. They probably aren’t males and they don’t live on THAT side of 8 Mile. I’m forever a fan of Hip-Hop music (and more) but sometimes I feel like the right people don’t listen to me… or Redman.

  • SOUTHSIDE A-TOWN

    spitting nothing but the truth. damn, Lyte this was on point. i knew i was gon learn something new/get educated over here. that 2nd & last paragraph is the real talk of the day, IMO.

  • BeerGangsta

    MS Lyte speaking the trueth. Black People are so dam BrainWash. Trying to prove something that God don’t accept lies! Why do 80 Percent of Black Men lie on there Dick. I am Black to so this is not a Racist act. Why do 80 Percent of Black Woman look like freaks. Know days dam near everybody is a Follower not a Leader. Lot of Men are CheerLeadrer!

  • curtis75Black

    Real Deep Sista ! I’ve said it also. If you don’t buy, don’t complain ! If you don’t like the what’s playing on the radio, change the station or turn it off !! Easy as writing comments in a Blog. We always had the power but felt it was taken away for some reason because we stopped seeing our favorites.

  • Jericho

    The problem is that there’s too many bum-ass rappers and not enough emcees in mainstream hip-hop. Rappers are not necessarily hip-hop. Emcees ARE hip-hop. Most emcees are intelligent, well-read and interesting people with stories to tell. Rappers tend to be people who can rhyme (again, most suck even at rapping) with very little substance or intelligence behind it. They glorify crime and ignorance at the expense of love and community which is what hip-hop is all about. They appeal to the lowest common denominator which unfortunately happens to be the least demanding so they get away with putting out garbage. So they stay winning while hip-hop stays losing.

    I personally refuse to listen to a lot of today’s rappers cos they suck balls…but I’ve never met an emcee who I couldn’t relate to even on the smallest level.

  • Enlightened

    Lyte,

    This is what I be stressin over though. None of the stuff that was forced down our throats with radio payola actually SOLD UNITS.
    Since you can’t say it, I will – Yes “Crank That” was trash and I remember laughing with everybody I knew when we first heard it, but like you – we got used to it

    But out of the all the artists who came out of this cookie cutter snap music/dance music era Soulja Boy, Dem Franchise Boys, Crime Mob, Shawty Lo, D4L, (insert 20 other artists here) NONE OF THEM WENT CLOSE TO PLATINUM

    and only one of them- D4L- EVEN HAVE A GOLD ALBUM.
    (I just checked it on the RIAA site to make sure I wasn’t remembering wrong)
    We know how much “Crank That Soulja Boy” and “Laffy Taffy” were forced down our throats to the point where it amounts to brainwashing, but NOBODY IS BUYING THOSE ALBUMS.

    During this same time period, artists like T.I., Lil’ Wayne, Jeezy, and others who are still about Beats and Rhymes, were selling double, triple, even quadruple what these other artists were selling.

    It’s more to it than what the fan is buying because when you look at sales, people are still not buying bullshit – never have.

    Soulja Boy is one of the biggest stars in hip-hop, but he doesn’t have a gold album to his name.

    So my question is, if we have that power, how come these dudes haven’t gone away even though have moved no units whatsoever?

  • DownSouth

    Very good post Lyte. Whenever money is involved, people could care less about creativity and innovation. I still buy CD’s and only cop the ones of artists who still try. Matter of fact, the last lp’s I copped were Twista, Eminem, T.I., Murs just to name a few.

    DOWN SOUTH!!!

  • capcobra

    hiphop needs to be more controversial and political..it’s too predictable now..that’s why it’s wack…rap beef ain’t controversy either…i’m talking more of a “fuck everybody and everything that aint positive” type of mc…a real intelligent hoodlum/chuck d/nas/paris type with a jay/50 business mind..til then it’s all downhill…the fiends/fans gon get what they can and make the most of it..beggars can’t be choosey..lol.

  • BIGNAT

    i own to much music to listen to the radio and if i am it’s to listen to jazz music.

  • Paul Cantor

    that’s real spit Lyte… need more of that

  • ri067953

    Yo, I have to disagree with this blog and and call bs. Hip-hop is not the only genre to suffer from this type of media oversaturation. Think about it, Elvis was the first mainstream rock n’ roll artist but we all know that rock’s innovators were playing music in juke joints long before Elvis came along.

    I feel that once innovative artist are supported commerically they will eventually sell out for that dollar. All you have to do is dig a little to find hip-hop artist that are creating substantial music. STOP LISTENING TO THE RADIO AND GO OUT TO LIVE SHOWS. SUPPORT THE CULTURE BEHIND THE MUSIC.

    • http://www.myspace.com/atlatino404 El Tico Loco

      What’s she trying to tell us is that WE have power to change the climate of the industry, what artists do to sellout is not as lucrative as it used to be so might as well come on back to real skills. This was a call to get the good music from the jukejoint back to The Tunnel state of mind without having to be cheesy or gimmicky. Can we for once have an artist with the skills to match their gear and their instrumentals and every hip hop fan will be happy.

  • http://OKAYSISTER.COM LYTE

    Rio, I don’t think we disagree at all. I am saying do whatever you must to support what and who you like. Buy the record or go see a performance. It’s all a way to show your love. Peace )

  • http://myspace.com/next5micstv Dj Tigga Pat

    your’e sure right , also we need to take back the radio stations from the corrupt program directors, and take back our culture and playlist ..DJ Tigga Pat / Next 5 Mics Tv/Houston

  • http://myspace/cincinamon Angela Sherice

    My sentiments exactly. I understand that everyone is trying to find and dig their niche in the music industry and hip-hop is a music that never seems to & never will go “out of style.” I have a protective kind of love for hip-hop because I was born when it was born-so I know the depths from which it came. Hip-hop is a culture that was built from the ground up. Everybody had a (personal) story behind what they spit at hip-hops beginning. So initiation into it and love for it, was REAL, it was passionate. Though hip-hop is a music that will never go out of style, even from its conception, some people tend to attach negative connotations where hip-hop is concerned, which I have always hated. So, like you feel, when you have people entering in [what I call "side doors into the game] for the fame of it, without thoroughly understanding the craft and its roots (not to mention respect for it), it very upsetting and simply for that fact, hip-hop is struggling and fighting its way not to be dumbed and watered down-trying to stay afloat and not be washed out by “supermaning hoes” and such (no pun or dis intended to the artist-I catch myself nodding and rapping to it as well).
    But I’m very curious to see which way this teeter is going to totter: whether they are going to wash (true) hip-hop out, or water (true) hip hoppers down to the same playing field. My true guess is the latter; because as you and I BOTH know-truthfully speaking; the biggest consumers of hip-hop right now could give a damn about nothing but nodding heads and supermaning hoes.
    Come on mannnn.

  • http://myspace/cincinamon Angela Sherice

    My sentiments exactly. I understand that everyone is trying to find and dig their niche in the music industry and hip-hop is a music that never seems to & never will go “out of style.” I have a protective kind of love for hip-hop because I was born when it was born-so I know the depths from which it came. Hip-hop is a culture that was built from the ground up. Everybody had a (personal) story behind what they spit at hip-hops beginning. So initiation into it and love for it, was REAL, it was passionate. Though hip-hop is a music that will never go out of style, even from its conception, some people tend to attach negative connotations where hip-hop is concerned, which I have always hated. So, like you feel, when you have people entering in [what I call "side doors into the game] for the fame of it, without thoroughly understanding the craft and its roots (not to mention respect for it), it very upsetting and simply for that fact, hip-hop is struggling and fighting its way not to be dumbed and watered down-trying to stay afloat and not be washed out by “supermaning hoes” and such (no pun or dis intended to the artist-I catch myself nodding and rapping to it as well).
    But I’m very curious to see which way this teeter is going to totter: whether they are going to wash (true) hip-hop out, or water (true) hip hoppers down to the same playing field. My true guess is the latter, because as you and I BOTH know-truthfully speaking; the biggest consumers of hip-hop right now could give a damn about nothing but nodding heads and supermaning hoes.
    Come on mannnn.

  • http://tonygrands.blogspot.com Tony Grands

    @Lyte

    First, thank you for responding to us. Even if you’re talking to a specific person, it let’s us know you’re reading what we have to say. None of the other guest’s did as much, though I’m positive that “Shaker” didn’t even write those for us. Duck sauce promotional tool.

    Anyhoo……

    I agree with what you’re saying, but the industry does have to meet us some of the way. Take your product theory, if ALL the easily attainable product is ass, then what choices are left to the consumer? If they need/want said product, how they think it should be contrived, they’ll abandon the producer & make it happen for themselves. Hence, downloading.

    Record labels & program directors act as if they make the music they want to hear, when 75% of it is bullshit, & WE don’t want to hear it. Like the song you were talking about yesterday, why should someone else have to be on it? Why was he speaking for us?

    Maybe the genuine consumer wants to hear Lyte, unadulterated, unassisted. Just a thought.

    The demographic’s game is so eff’d up, that according to their calculations, hip hop fans only exist on the Net. Which isn’t true. I know heads who would can’t afford a computer, much less an MP3 player. They would love to hear some genuine good music, versus the same, lame, robot music geared toward young adults who don’t know any better but to do what everyone else is doing.

    So, you have to help us out too, feel me?

    (Normally that “feel me” would get a pause, but, go ‘head, being that your MC Lyte & all…..lol)

  • http://www.imeem.com/daillestjayinfamous JayBear

    Usually I read the blogs and comments but never speak my peace. Here I have to say hands down that was the best blog I ever read. You hit the nail on this one. As an artist, I think its all about staying Truth to Yaself. Loyal hip hop fans know what is real and what is fake. As a fan, we are the ones in control. I say forget what record labels and program directors want to hear or sell. In the end, we’re the ones who ever buy (the bullshit) or trash it. Hip hop comes in so many flavors yet some are poisonous. I think we all know who in the Hip hop industry cares what their fans want and think or they wouldn’t be bitching & complaining on Twitter (which I don’t follow. Just another money thievin’ site). Veterans are getting old. Its up to the New Generation to pass the knowledge and maturity

    All in all thumbs up. Thanks 4 hearing us out.
    ——————————————–
    @Tony Grands. I dig ya state of mind. Keep up the work on ya blogs.

  • bakerboi

    Thank you MC LTYE, I’m straight OG right here, got you shit in my Ipod right now because none other female rappers got shit on what you were rappin about 20 years ago, PERIOD. Let me ask you guys this, do yall remember back in the day it’s was a crime to bite anything someone else was going? This is the problem, we have lost that in the Hip Hop community. Man, if you bit someone you got hung on wax. You couldn’t be coming around like that you had to have your own stlye. These kids today don’t know nothing about that and if we tell them then we are the one trippin. I mean look around, everyone look alike. When a fad come, it’s like a tital wave and everyone is doing the say shit. Look at Kanye, Lil Wayne and every other artist trying to get in the game. They bit T Pain so hard becuz he brough back a CLASSIC STYLE and flipped it. This was a major case of bitting becuz TP was just coming into the game and making a name and niche for himself and Kanye and Lil Wang was OG’s in the game and they took 2 steps back with those wack ass albums (yes, I said it). But look at what happen, the youth jumped on it like a white boy on big tits and they went multi-plat. Why, not becuz the record were good, but becuz they did what was already done. TP was a rapper turned singa and I respected him for that, these cat still want to be rapper, but won’t come out the closet and just be sangers. get a grip LYTE is so rite, I haven’t bought nothing in a while and the funny thing is I was @ Bestbuy yesterday trying to get that Slaughterhouse and couldn’t find not one copy, not becuz they were out, but becuz they didn’t order any. but a bunch of that garbage was there in full stock.

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