It seems like just yesterday Miley Cyrus was collaborating with Juicy J and getting on remixes with French Montana. Well, don't expect those days to return. In a recent interview with Billboard, the 24-year-old singer said she was distancing herself from hip-hop—or, at least, the type she feels oversexualizes women.

Answering a question about singer Melanie Safka's influence on her music, Miley eventually ventured off into the reasons why she's put some distance between herself and the genre she occasionally dabbled in a few years ago. Like just about everyone else, though, she's a fan of that new K. Dot.

"But I also love that new Kendrick [Lamar] song [“Humble”]: 'Show me somethin’ natural like ass with some stretch marks,'" she explained. "I love that because it’s not 'Come sit on my dick, suck on my cock.' I can’t listen to that anymore. That’s what pushed me out of the hip-hop scene a little. It was too much 'Lamborghini, got my Rolex, got a girl on my cock'—I am so not that."

After discussing the "political" vibe of her forthcoming new album, Miley eventually returned to hip-hop, focusing specifically on the notion that she was ever appropriating Black culture.

"It’s mind-boggling to me that there was even a controversy around me having black dancers. That became a thing, where people said I was taking advantage of Black culture, and with Mike [WiLL Made-It]—what the fuck? That wasn’t true. Those were the dancers I liked!" Miley explained.

Miley said she took criticism from music industry figures when she said she wanted to work with Pharrell Williams, whom she collabed with on the 2014 track "Come Get It Bae."

"When I met Pharrell [Williams], before 'Blurred Lines,' before 'Happy,' people wouldn’t take meetings with me because they said, 'He hasn’t had a hit in 10 years.' They wanted to put me with the Dr. Luke's of the world, the Max Martin's, and put me through the fucking assembly line, and I said, 'No. This is someone who actually cares about me. This is someone I feel safe with.' I got completely shut out, and I had to just trust myself. What feels right to me feels right to my fans, because they know some dude in a suit didn’t tell me to do it."

It's unclear how people will take Miley distancing herself from certain types of hip-hop, but there's a good chance it sparks up the conversation about the singer's past relationship with the genre people guard so fiercely.

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