Hit-Boy Is Trying To Recreate Quality Vibes With His HS87 Imprint, Audio Push Project

Do you have an album coming out soon?
Nothing right now, I’m just working on new music. I’m seeing how things flow, ’cause I just finished working on Audio Push’s new project, who also signed to my label HS87. Now I’m just going to start working on ideas for myself and see where it goes. My team is first ’cause that’s all I’m repping, that’s all I’m doing. It’s a team effort. I’ve been around so many different camps and I’ve seen how the best of the best work. They have a real team, and they really—everybody plays their position and everybody does something better than somebody else. I definitely have that with my camp. I grew up with Audio Push; I knew Oktane from the group since he was like 13, I was 16. We’ve known each other for over 10 years, from when I first started making beats. Like the very first month I start making beats, I met Oktane.

Audio Push’s Come As You Are is a quality tape. When did y’all put that together?
We were on tour opening for Lil Wayne. We did about 40 dates and we had a studio bus, a fully functional studio. We just started out on beats, and it started to take shape on its own. We kept making great songs and we were able to get all the features, ’cause naturally everybody just wanted to be a part of the project that’s on it. It was an organic thing. The project just kind of took shape on its own. This is the first time I really went in with Audio Push, even though we were friends for so many years. This is the first project I put together for them and I feel like it’s just some of the best music I made in my whole life.

What do you want the HS87 legacy to be?
I’m just trying bring back that real music; just different stuff, just different types of energy. And I feel like a lot of people get stuck and make the same type of music and just recreate shit. I feel like I’m one of the only producers in this whole entire universe that every time you hear a beat from me it don’t sound nothing like the last beat. It’s kind of hard to find that. I really pride myself on that. I strive for that. I like to challenge myself. ‘Cause most of the stuff I really listen to is my shit, my homies. I want to make something that I can really listen to. I really do this because I really love making music. I’m not doing this solely for the check, or solely for the fame. I’m really in this to create music. Just trying to recreate vibes that I got when I was a kid. I can remember my mom playing quality music. I’m not trying to make no shit that I don’t feel like its quality and get it out to the people. I’m just trying to recreate the vibe man.

What are some of your influences?
Definitely R&B stuff, I grew up on producers like Teddy Riley, Babyface and The Underdogs, stuff like that. I’m a feel type of person. I don’t really make music from a technical standpoint; I just do what I feel. That’s why none of my shit sounds like these other producers. It’s all about the vibe. To be honest, I don’t listen to a bunch of older stuff. I listen to Mary J. Blige’s What’s the 411, Joe’s My Name Is Joe—that’s one of my favorite albums—a lot of Brandy stuff, some Beyoncé stuff. All types of different music.

What’s the difference between Rapper Hit-Boy vs Producer Hit-Boy?
I’m more personal when I’m working on my stuff. When you’re working on another person’s project, you’re trying to help them tell their story. But when I’m working on mine, I can be as free as I want to, say what I want to, make the type of music I want to make, exactly how I want to make it. It’s just more personal.

Is it hard sometimes to switch hats?
Naw, it’s been years, its always been that way. I don’t really put one over the other. I just like music.