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tanning of america

tanning of america

XXL: What were some of the most surprising things you came across while making it?
AS: Not shocking, really, but one of the things that Billy and I found interesting was that Billy and I would sit in the office and see how Stoute kind of followed his timeline in his book. We looked at it as one of our jobs, to kind of round it out and fill it in with politics and society and larger cultural events. So one of the things that was most fun about this was kind of connecting those dots. I remember in Episode 2, we have the Rodney King verdict, or the Rodney King case to begin with, leading into the election of Bill Clinton. Then, by the time you get to Episode 4, you're at Hurricane Katrina leading into the election of President Obama. I think looking at those kinds of macro events that don’t necessarily have a direct connection to pop culture, I think stitching those together was the most fun.

BC: I don’t know if I would call this shocking, but perhaps provocative: revisiting some of the Norman Lear sitcoms and how they so candidly dealt with race and racism. Like All In The Family and The Jeffersons. How just overt but genuinely moving and funny they are. You watch those clips and you say, “Shit, they couldn’t do a show like this now.” It’s sad in a way that you couldn’t, but they are provocative in a way. And seeing some of the overt racism during the protests. White people coming out in the streets, shouting at protesters telling them to “go back where they came from.” I don’t think you would see any of that today.

XXL: What were some of the most surprising things you came across while making it?

AS: Not shocking, really, but one of the things that Billy and I found interesting was that Billy and I would sit in the office and see how Stoute kind of followed his timeline in his book. We looked at it as one of our jobs, to kind of round it out and fill it in with politics and society and larger cultural events. So one of the things that was most fun about this was kind of connecting those dots. I remember in Episode 2, we have the Rodney King verdict, or the Rodney King case to begin with, leading into the election of Bill Clinton. Then, by the time you get to Episode 4, you're at Hurricane Katrina leading into the election of President Obama. I think looking at those kinds of macro events that don’t necessarily have a direct connection to pop culture, I think stitching those together was the most fun.

BC: I don’t know if I would call this shocking, but perhaps provocative: revisiting some of the Norman Lear sitcoms and how they so candidly dealt with race and racism. Like All In The Family and The Jeffersons. How just overt but genuinely moving and funny they are. You watch those clips and you say, “Shit, they couldn’t do a show like this now.” It’s sad in a way that you couldn’t, but they are provocative in a way. And seeing some of the overt racism during the protests. White people coming out in the streets, shouting at protesters telling them to “go back where they came from.” I don’t think you would see any of that today.
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‘Tanning Of America’ Directors On How Hip-Hop Is Changing America

Nas, Steve Stoute, the Reverend Al Sharpton, longtime Def Jam publicist Bill Adler, FUBU founder Daymond John, and even comedian Jerry Seinfeld all showed up to the premiere of the first two episodes of VH1's four-part Tanning Of America series, based on Stoute's book of the same name that tracks the rise and increasing influence of hip-hop in the mainstream world. The premiere, held at the Paley Center For Media in midtown Manhattan, focused on the various aspects of hip-hop's influence in pop culture, from the clothing to the art to the marketing to the politics and, of course, the music. Following the screening of the first two episodes—the first of which covers the years of 1970-1986, with the second detailing 1987-1992—a five-person panel which included Nas, Stoute, John, Sharpton and Fab 5 Freddy and was moderated by Gayle King spoke about the experience of growing up in and shaping the culture which has emerged as an undeniable force in American identity. XXL was on hand for the premiere—the first episode of which airs on VH1 on Monday, Feb. 24—and collected eleven things we learned from the screening and the panel discussion afterward, from lessons on Good Times vs. Happy Days to Eazy-E's reaction to the FBI taking notice of N.W.A's lyrics. —Dan Rys (@danrys)
Nas, Steve Stoute, the Reverend Al Sharpton, longtime Def Jam publicist Bill Adler, FUBU founder Daymond John, and even comedian Jerry Seinfeld all showed up to the premiere of the first two episodes of VH1's four-part Tanning Of America series, based on Stoute's book of the same name that tracks the rise and increasing influence of hip-hop in the mainstream world. The premiere, held at the Paley Center For Media in midtown Manhattan, focused on the various aspects of hip-hop's influence in pop culture, from the clothing to the art to the marketing to the politics and, of course, the music.

Following the screening of the first two episodes—the first of which covers the years of 1970-1986, with the second detailing 1987-1992—a five-person panel which included Nas, Stoute, John, Sharpton and Fab 5 Freddy and was moderated by Gayle King spoke about the experience of growing up in and shaping the culture which has emerged as an undeniable force in American identity. XXL was on hand for the premiere—the first episode of which airs on VH1 on Monday, Feb. 24—and collected eleven things we learned from the screening and the panel discussion afterward, from lessons on Good Times vs. Happy Days to Eazy-E's reaction to the FBI taking notice of N.W.A's lyrics. —Dan Rys (@danrys)
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11 Things We Learned From Last Night’s ‘Tanning Of America’ Premiere

nas steve stoute
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Nas Doesn’t Think He’s Mainstream

Nas was in attendance last night for the premiere of VH1's Tanning Of America: One Nation Under Hip-Hop premiere, where he was featured on a panel moderated by Gayle King and featuring the likes of Al Sharpton, Fab 5 Freddy, FUBU founder Daymond John and longtime manager—and author of The Tanning Of America: How Hip-Hop Created A Culture That Rewrote The Rules Of The New Economy—Steve Stoute...

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