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Sean Price, Mic Tyson

When rappers get older and have kids, oftentimes they make obligatory family man records. At best, critics laud them for their maturity and at worst, fans accuse them of “going soft.” On Sean Price’s latest studio album, Mic Tyson, neither responses are accurate. The Brownsville MC took his time (album was announced in 2009) with this project to become a father. But the only indication he’s drawn some inspiration from raising a kid might be on “Hush,” where he converts a famous lullaby into a humorous death threat sing-along targetted at wack rappers. To hell with a missed opportunity, this that raw.

Throughout much of his career, the Boot Camp Clik member has held a solid track record, mostly due to his consistency in topic choice; ruffian declarations, struggle rapper clowning, and self-aware observations of the industry. On Mic Tyson, he doesn’t miss a beat, giving out gems like “that hardcore rapping is played out, until I hardcore slap you then ask you what’s played out?” on “Price & Shining Armor.” It’s that self-deprecative, yet unapologetic voice that makes an underdog sound like a champ.

With that said, these verses could’ve fit on any of his past records or mixtapes. But the production on Mic Tyson ties them together nicely. P reaches out to past collaborators 9th Wonder and Khrysis, some newcomers, and underground darling Alchemist for a cohesively dark sound. There’s a steady pace to everything, perfectly complementing P’s slow flow and staccato delivery, while evoking a creeping, stalkerish, horror flick vibe. There are variations though, most notably on “Title Track,” which sounds like a Timberland-boot-stomping Russian squat dance, and the Evidence-produced “BBQ Sauce” could easily serve as the theme song for the final boss in a Mega Man game.

While few hiccups, like an uninspired chorus by Torae on “By The Way” and an iffy second verse eclipsed by the first on “Pyrex,” slightly tilts the album, those are minor bumps on a solid project. Sean Price can be that gentle family man at home, but when he steps in the ring, beatings are administered by a professional. —David “Rek” Lee (@Rekstizzy)

  • Lolrax

    The album was fire, I copped it yesterday and I loved it. P’s flow is a breath of fresh air amongst all of the trap music and louis vitton bullshit going on lately.

  • intactsf

    Everything Sean Price has put out since Monkey Barz has been excellent, and this latest development is the culmination of it all. P!

  • Booger Brain

    honestly the only critique i have of the album is the man is quite obviously out of shape and maybe abusing drugs instead of enjoying them. He struggles to pronounce words but i mean that as a comparison to his previous efforts (monkey barz all the way up to heltah skeltah) where he executes complex structures effortlessly. For example in the song “Pyrex” the lines “love is love, clap the gat at ya’ll haters, the CEO of your label is a basketball player” sounds like hes struggling to say the lines and words slur in together. That being said i purchased the album (my first music purchase in god knows how long) and im happy with my purchase and if i had the choice to do it again i wouldn’t change my decision.

    Instead of just commenting on a negative, here are the positives: the mans structure is the shit, he’s obviously well read as far as knowing what hes talking about, life experience makes the album and he’s funny as hell (not like a clown, not like he’s here to amuse me haha).

    Good Cunt (term of endearment)

  • AZ40

    album fire been bumpin on repeat since i got it. Nuff Said

  • http://twitter.com/SDK_RS SDK

    GREAT!!!!

  • http://www.facebook.com/OddBeatz Beat Konstruckta

    This album is weak. He’s too one dimensional.