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On The State Of Rap-Rock Collaborations
Mike Shinoda: "A lot of that stuff, it’s more ingrained at this point. It’s more fused together. We always talk about when we make a hybrid of something, there are different ways to do it. Like, you can blend it together, meaning if you put something in a blender, you blend it and the two things become inseparable. It’s like you make a smoothie, you can’t see all the things that are in there. It’s just one thing. But, there’s another approach that’s called making a salad. Okay, you put all those things in there, and you can see every individual thing.

"You can approach all your songs any of those ways, but I feel like right now a lot of the stuff is out there is more like that first thing. It’s really blended together and you can’t tell when you listen to like a Lana Del Rey song. You know that hip-hop is in there, but you can’t pull it out. It's engrained in the beats and in the production approach. Similarly, you like listen to some rap stuff, like some of Kanye’s stuff. It’s very musical. It’s very rock. It’s jammed in there so effortlessly that you can’t discern one thing from another."

Rakim: "It’s been going on since hip-hop. I was one of the rappers that wished I had one of the Run-DMC beats. It’s really nothing new. We’ve been showing the similarities between rock and rap for the longest. I just felt it was my turn. Nah, mean?

Mike Shinoda: "This is a landmark in a certain category for us. We’ve never put out a new song on a new record with another artist this way. We’ve done collaborations with other people. But, like, the Jay Z record was based on music that was already put out. We did a song with Busta Rhymes that was a single, it was a one-off. That wasn’t our music either. That was his producer’s music. So, this is the first time we’ve had a track and we invited someone into our house. We don’t do that. It takes somebody that we have to have a special situation in connection and whatever to feel conformable to do that."

Rakim: "I appreciate that, man. Thanks for the welcome mat. I hope I didn’t burn it out, man. Leave it at the door and I’ll be back."

On The State Of Rap-Rock Collaborations

Mike Shinoda: "A lot of that stuff, it’s more ingrained at this point. It’s more fused together. We always talk about when we make a hybrid of something, there are different ways to do it. Like, you can blend it together, meaning if you put something in a blender, you blend it and the two things become inseparable. It’s like you make a smoothie, you can’t see all the things that are in there. It’s just one thing. But, there’s another approach that’s called making a salad. Okay, you put all those things in there, and you can see every individual thing.

"You can approach all your songs any of those ways, but I feel like right now a lot of the stuff is out there is more like that first thing. It’s really blended together and you can’t tell when you listen to like a Lana Del Rey song. You know that hip-hop is in there, but you can’t pull it out. It's engrained in the beats and in the production approach. Similarly, you like listen to some rap stuff, like some of Kanye’s stuff. It’s very musical. It’s very rock. It’s jammed in there so effortlessly that you can’t discern one thing from another."

Rakim: "It’s been going on since hip-hop. I was one of the rappers that wished I had one of the Run-DMC beats. It’s really nothing new. We’ve been showing the similarities between rock and rap for the longest. I just felt it was my turn. Nah, mean?

Mike Shinoda: "This is a landmark in a certain category for us. We’ve never put out a new song on a new record with another artist this way. We’ve done collaborations with other people. But, like, the Jay Z record was based on music that was already put out. We did a song with Busta Rhymes that was a single, it was a one-off. That wasn’t our music either. That was his producer’s music. So, this is the first time we’ve had a track and we invited someone into our house. We don’t do that. It takes somebody that we have to have a special situation in connection and whatever to feel conformable to do that."

Rakim: "I appreciate that, man. Thanks for the welcome mat. I hope I didn’t burn it out, man. Leave it at the door and I’ll be back."

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