Marginalizing the idiot vote

If I actually get around to voting in the presidential primaries next spring, it’ll be my first time actually voting in one, even though I’ve been old enough to vote since the 2000 election.

Part of the problem is that, like Talib Kweli and the guy who draws the Boondocks, I could give a rat’s ass about voting anyway. Not that I don’t think people should take part in the political process, but I read too much to think that voting can change anything. Also, if I remember correctly, these things are usually pretty much decided by the time it’s Missouri’s chance to vote.

The way these primaries work, if you live in Iowa, which I believe has the first primary, your vote counts way more than if you live next door here in Missouri. And if you live New Hampshire or South Carolina, which also have early primaries, your votes also count way more than anyone else in the country. By the time those few states have voted, the race could be all but decided.

Why is this the case? I’m not sure. Freshman-level government is the only class I ever flunked in college – because I forgot I was in the class and didn’t show up for like a month. For what it’s worth, I showed up for the finals, and I’m pretty sure I had a high enough percentage to at least. But you know how college professors can flunk your ass on GP.

Fuck college.

Anyway, the way our system is set up is especially unfortunate, since, why should those states dictate which candidates from the two major parties get to run for president? I don’t know that any of them is representative of everywhere else in the country, and South Carolina in particular is apparently overrun with idiots. How else to explain this story in the Times the other day about the outreach the Obama campaign has been doing in black beauty parlors down there.

The gist of the story is that Obama has been sending his campaign workers into these places, because you know how black people tend to form their political opinions in hair salons rather than, say, the library or whatever. But many of the black women in these places are still leaning towards Hillary, because a) she’s a woman, b) because she’s married to Bill Clinton, and c) they’re afraid Obama will be assassinated by the CIA, Lyndon Johnson, and the military-industrial complex. Just like JFK. No, really.

You might just want to read the whole thing, but here’s a few representative quotes, to give you an idea of the kind of people who will be deciding the fate of our democracy, and, by extension, the fate of the entire free world.

Here’s an old black lady named Miss Clara (I wonder if she’s also a psychic) on how she plans to save Barack Obama’s life by not voting for him:

“I fear that they just would kill him, that he wouldn’t even have a chance,” she said as she styled a customer’s hair with a curling iron. One way to protect him, she suggested, would be not to vote for him.

Here’s another old black lady named Betty McClain on the fact that Hillary has already been president once:

“She’s already been president before,” Ms. McClain said approvingly, dismissing Bill Clinton’s role in his own administration. “He was just there,” Ms. McClain said of Mr. Clinton. “He was just the husband, that’s all. She really ran the country.”

And here’s a lady named Maria Hewett, who provides some historical perspective on the fact that Barack Obama will be shot as soon as he takes office:

“Things happened with presidents in the past, and they weren’t African-Americans,” Ms. Hewett said, sitting in one of two big barber chairs, her hair in curlers. “President Kennedy was a good person, and somebody took him down,” she said, prompting a chorus of “that’s true, that’s true.”

That’s true, that’s true, indeed.

Which brings me to my point: If we’re going to have this system of staggered primaries by state, which doesn’t make that much sense to me anyway, why not have them in order of intelligence? Start out up in Taxachussetts and then make your way down either of the coasts, then out to the Midwest. No state in the South should be allowed to state their opinion until the course of the election is all but decided.

Would that not be a much better system than the one we have currently?

  • Redd

    so basically, youre telling me SOUTHERNERS get to pick who runs for president? nice, real fuckin nice.

  • og bobby j

    while i see the comedic value of your argument, i would have to say that intelligence is not a regional issue. Having said that, I do find that underdeveloped and under industrialized lands such as in the south (but in middle america as well, i mean people actually live in a place known as tornado alley! Just fucking move idiots), tend to have a greater majority of people with low levels of education and what i perceive to be a less demanding standards. I have no data to back that up, just my perception based on what i see. In any event, I am sure there are just as many stupid fucks up here in the NY as there is in the NO.

    • Sutol

      Co-sign.

      Traditionally and historically, the underdeveloped and under industrialized lands that exist in the South often land at the bottom of the socio-economic totem pole thus making these places breeding grounds for lack of education, awareness and change. (Hence making education a COMPLETELEY regional issue)

      BUT, Bol, the real issue here is the Electoral College, not necessarily the stupid motherfuckers who live in the state, but the stupid motherfuckers who make the decisions in these states (although elected by stupid motherfuckers soooo…) who are often from the know-nothing-wing of the political spectrum.

    • Worley

      Intelligence is definitely a regional issue. Traditionally, southerners sent their children north for education. That is where the industrial centers and all the money is. Persons with education congregate there to misapply education for some of that money.

      The electoral college thing is funky indeed. It was a post-emancipation way for the South to obtain redress and to have an influence on politics. That’s the real fix about voting.

  • Fire

    This post was funny, and it’s definitely good for a laugh. Yeah, there’s stupid motherfuckers everywhere, but those quotes you cited were ridiculously stupid. If that lady likes Barack Obama, vote for him. Don’t “protect” him by not voting for him. I’m sure he can handle himself.

    Plus, voting is really important. The fact that the last two presidential elections were very close really underscores that.

  • http://xxlmag.com Bol

    >while i see the comedic value of your argument, i would have to say that intelligence is not a regional issue.

    Well, *facts* would tend to suggest otherwise.

    You should look it up in an encyclopedia or something.

    Here, I’ll help you out.

    http://encarta.msn.com/encnet/departments/adultlearning/Default.aspx?article=mosteducatedstates

    See, everything’s not just a matter of your personal opinion!

    • Fire

      There are so many factors included in that study that could skew the data into your position or the opposing position (yes, I looked at the link). Just because you get a degree doesn’t make you successful (I’m going to college, by the way, so don’t go there). Bill Gates, the richest man in the world, was a college dropout. Intelligence isn’t a regional issue by any means. Even the author of the link admits these various factors.

      “Regarding the low end of the list, it’s clear that some of the states listed face economic hurdles based on struggling industries such as coal mining (West Virginia) and a high proportion of service-industry jobs (Louisiana) that generally offer lower pay scales than skilled labor or white-collar employment. And from the Morgan Quinto list alone, it’s clear that Alaska, California, and Hawaii have some education-expenditure prioritizing to do.”

      • Doobie

        Any study of this nature can only study trends and present results that are generally the case based on those trends. You’re right, just because you get a degree doesn’t mean that you’ll be successful, but it does mean that you’re more *likely* to be “successful”. Bill Gates is an anomaly to say the least. Intelligence may not be a regional issue, but there does seem to be regional trends that are a direct result of the level of education of the people in that region. There are lots of smart people that never make it to college, but college can really help to sort of fine tune a sort of “functional intelligence” that you’ll need for other people with money to have confidence in you, if you want run your own business, and especially if you want to get your corporate hustle on.

        As for the quote in the second paragraph, the number of jobs in those industries will fluctuate based on demand, but the market value (which determines pay) and the education required sure as heck won’t (unless the requirements of the jobs change).

  • N.O. 4 life

    i haven’t met an intelligent black person yet that gives a rats ass about voting…other than the ones who use it to stop the arguement”you cant complain if you did’nt vote”

  • LowEndofDaChi

    LMAO!

    You gotta wonder, what was the NY Times real aim when doing this article?

    Good shit though Bol

  • 4 ya momma

    the south will rise the south will rise the south is gonna rise again .those good ole folk out there really scare me black and white i just dont know whats wrong with them it must be the water god help us we need you more than ever

  • 4 ya momma

    oh 1 more thing for all of you people that think voting doesnt matter u might be right but understand this overwelming truth must be exposed at one time or other if we all voted and the numbers come out fuck the fuck up there is gonna be some explaining to do belive that maybe only red states see the importance in a vote regardless of ignorence
    what the fuck go vote on the way to getting ya swishers it aint gonna hurt u dummy fucks

  • C-Money

    When you say taxachussets…u ain’t lying Bol. But seriously, if people are not voting for OBama because they are afraid for his life, then we as Black people are a lot worse off than I thought. At least have a legitimate reason for not voting for him.

  • http://www.theunderwriters.blogspot.com THE UNDERWRITER

    I definitely think that primaries are skewed. Who the hell cares what Iowa thinks in the real world? And do I really want to believe that Iowans know better than me who should lead us? Seems like Iowa might have a big bestiality culture on the low or something. Maybe on the high.

    And why is the DNC really thinking about suing Florida and keeping them from sending delegates to the national convention next year if they crank that primary before schedule?

    All presidential primaries should start with THE UNDERWRITER’S approval. Without me, politics is dead.

    • LowEndofDaChi

      LMAO @ “Maybe on the high.”
      I thought I was the only person that said that shit.

    • Cuban Link

      yo co-sign, the dead rat behind my shower is more known in my neighborhood than “Iowa”

  • Around and Around

    Anyway, the way our system is set up is especially unfortunate, since, why should those states dictate which candidates from the two major parties get to run for president?
    ————–
    The media decides who the ‘front-runners’ are long before these states do. Examine how the media treats even outlyers in both major parties early on, Ron Paul or Dennis Kucinch.

    It’s time to start boycotting voting. Voting for an unjust system makes you a willing participant in a scam.

    • Cuban Link

      you are one crazy negro

    • LowEndofDaChi

      I actually mess with that guy Dennis Kucinch. Too bad this election will be dominated by the popular kids.

      • Around and Around

        Cuban Link says:

        you are one crazy negro
        ———–
        What is more crazy; Voting for an unjust system and consistantly being conned into voting for ’2 evils’ or recognizing the fact that the system is fucked and not accepting it.

        Imagine what a slap in the face it woud be to Washington if 90% of the US did not participate in their bogus elections? Already half the country doesn’t.

        • Fire

          Around And Around,
          What exactly would that change? It would make it easier for power to be concentrated in the hands of a few extremists since fewer people would be voting, and then things would probably get a lot worse. In order to change the system, we have to work within it. Look at what MLK did as evidence.

        • Around and Around

          What do you mean by look at MLK as evidence?

          Doing that supports my argument, the stratagy is the same as MLK’s peaceful resistance against a corrupt system.

          Newsflash: extremeist already hold power, torture/no due process/ wire tapping Americans/gualags across the world …etc.

          Joel Hirschhorn put is best:

          Whether you are on the political left or right, you will fear that not voting will help put in office people that support policies your abhor. But decades of objective political reality tell us that even people from the party that we align with do not, when elected, fulfill their promises and our hopes. Sadly, most Americans have become lesser-evil voters, deluding themselves that this is the best, least worse, yet awful choice. Instead of feeling bad about voting for candidates that we know in our hearts are not worthy of our votes and public office, we must have the courage to say “enough is enough; I will not play in this shameful game any longer.” We must stop legitimizing and abetting our disgraceful government.

        • Fire

          What I mean by looking at MLK as evidence is working within the system, not detaching yourself from it all together. MLK’s actions led to important legislation such as the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act, which brought change in the system without detaching yourself from it. Both of those increased rights greatly. Not voting may be peaceful resistance, but it’s also apathetic resistance. The past two presidential elections have been very close, and with all the Bush bashing I hear people doing John Kerry probably would have won if those people had voted. Same with the 2000 election. How you stop legitimizing and abetting our disgraceful government is to let them know that what they are doing is not working, and voting can be a step towards doing that. Remember, political and social change takes a long time, it can’t just happen overnight.

        • Around and Around

          And if John Kerry would have won what would really have changed? This is speculation, but I’m more then confident in saying we’d probably still be in Iraq, still have gitmo, and the Patriot Act would still be on the books. Dem’s control the house and senate nothing has changed….status quo that’s the purpose man.

          And how exactly do you let this disgraceful government know what they are doing is not working? By voting for them? How does that let them know when you continue to submit to their game, they set the rules, they run the media(see lead up to Iraq) they control every aspect of the system, good luck with that. It’s a monopoly posing as a duopoly.

          I would say vote for third party but that also is pointless. The system is rigged against third party, if Nader had, at the very least gotten into the Presidential debates of 2000 he would have smoked those two clowns Gore and Bush.

        • Fire

          I wasn’t saying John Kerry would have changed the world, I was saying that voting is incredibly important because elections often come out close.

          How you let the government know what they’re doing is not working is protesting policies that you don’t like and mobilizing with other people to promote change and actually BE IN IT FOR THE LONG HAUL, NOT BECAUSE AN ISSUE MAY BE A SHORT TERM CAUSE DU JOUR. Plus, many things aren’t really fad causes, they’re problems that need to be fixed badly and that someone needs to address. This isn’t easy, but it has been done by some with great effect despite government policy and control.

          I’m not saying people can count on politicians to change the world because change often happens outside the political system first (see Gahndi, King, Malcolm X, etc.), but presidents like Lincoln and Kennedy sure as hell had an impact on the American system. Granted, change takes far more than voting, but voting can help.

        • Doobie

          Hold up a second here Around and Around, if Kerry were elected, I seriously doubt that we’d still be “in” Iraq (other than in a limited capacity offering at most logistical support and having small groups of special ops searching for Al Qaeda operatives) and I’m certain that we wouldn’t still have Gitmo or the Patriot Act (at least not with the current compromises in our civil liberties). This is really a separation of powers issue, there’s only so much that Congress when it comes to war or executive powers. The only thing that not voting does is give the people that you like the least even more power to do whatever they want without even being challenged

        • Doobie

          *Correction*: This is really a separation of powers issue, there’s only so much that Congress can do when it comes to war or other executive powers.

        • Around and Around

          It’s not a seperation of powers issue congress can very easily stop the war by stopping it’s funding, they control the scrilla. Plain and simple.

          if Kerry were elected, I seriously doubt that we’d still be “in” Iraq

          yet he voted for the war, as did all the others…..
          —-
          Anyways agree to disagre.

          Good luck with your vote causing change; who’s going to bring it for you this year Clinton or Giuliani. Lesser of two evils right? Baaaaa says the sheep

  • gutta

    BOl, sometimes you really come off as an idiot. so your saying the answer to voting for the proper candidate can be fixed by starting with northern states, then moving down south? that goes down as one of the more dumb things ive read from you. Maybe people from down south are perceieved to not be as “intelligent ” as northern people(im from jersey by the way) but since when has intelligence meant anything in terms of the entire presidential race is concerned..our last two presidents were from the south and one is perceieved to be intelligent and the other a total idiot,so wheres the argument? colin powell didnt run because he feared for his life so give barack obama credit for having the guts to even run when im sure he recieving all kinds of threats. but i do agree with the fact that a state having votes being “more important” than another being just wrong and goes to show that theres is a systme that he designed to helping certain people but regardless EVERYONE should vote just so the Right person gets in office. take it how you want

  • Doobie

    This was a great post Bol and I’m all for having state primaries in order of education and intelligence (and in terms of quality of life, the folks up there in “Taxachussettes” seem to be doing quite well, especially compared to say, a no-good contributing nothing to the National GDP siphon of a state like Kansas). Those comments by those women in South Carolina scare me…makes me think maybe I’ve been a little too hard on my generation. You’re right about things being basically decided after the first few primary states. The reason? It’s kind of like this “air of inevitability” increasingly ascribed to Hillary Clinton; between incessant polling (which focuses on whether or not it’s statistically possible for candidate “A” to be successful in state “X” etc.,), non-stop political coverage in the news, and each political party shooting for whichever candidate seems to have the best chance to win the general election, the perception of “momentum” that’s created by the outcome of the early primaries can seal a candidates fate within the first few weeks.

    Also, I checked out that Encarta link and I couldn’t help but notice how DEEPLY red most of those states on the bottom of the “smart” list are.

  • Pingback: University Update - Barack Obama - Marginalizing the idiot vote

  • Jax

    >while i see the comedic value of your argument, i would have to say that intelligence is not a regional issue.

    Well, *facts* would tend to suggest otherwise.

    You should look it up in an encyclopedia or something.

    Here, I’ll help you out.

    http://encarta.msn.com/encnet/departments/adultlearning/Default.aspx?article=mosteducatedstates

    See, everything’s not just a matter of your personal opinion!

    = funniest response evar.

  • og bobby j

    Damn Bol – i think you were tryin to play me out….I think we both know that every so -called expert study is based on midigating factors which will ultimately skew the results in favor of the argument the study is defending. You should come out of your mother basement once in a while…jerk off

  • c.gabi

    i don’t think anyone should be terrified by the comments made by old black ladies in south carolina; they’re simply reflective of those women’s experiences. our generation hasn’t witnessed an assasination on the levels of jfk, bobby, mlk jr, and malcolm x. those events tore our country up…..so yeah, imagine what would happen if barack got shot up.—PANDEMONIUM

    i agree with whoever said that the electoral college is what is most important.

    and to be honest, southern votes are insignificant anyway, because based on the electoral college, only like 2-4 of the states (tx, fl, ga, sc) are worth a lot of the electoral college votes anyway.

    personally, i think the electoral college should be based on how many people in that state actually vote instead of how many people live there.

    • Doobie

      “personally, i think the electoral college should be based on how many people in that state actually vote instead of how many people live there.”

      Now that’s an interesting idea.

  • fg

    when will americans learn that the south is full of nuthing but slow witted cotton pickers?i personally think they should seceed from the united states

  • these posts are racist

    Byron,

    Nice/creative writing. Honestly if you based democracy (allowing the people to choose their leaders) on the people’s intelligence, you would have a dictatorship. It is not just black women salons that produce stupid political opinion. The majority of the country/world is made up of stupid sheep.

    That’s why catch phrases and fear tactics keep people in check. If people on average were really critical thinkers – we would keep these power and money hungry leaders of ours in check. And the world would be a wonderful place.

  • May

    Here’s an old black lady named Miss Clara (I wonder if she’s also a psychic) on how she plans to save Barack Obama’s life by not voting for him:

    “I fear that they just would kill him, that he wouldn’t even have a chance,” she said as she styled a customer’s hair with a curling iron. One way to protect him, she suggested, would be not to vote for him.

    ^^^^Didn’t Chris Rock make a joke out of this sometime in the past? Sh*t, what he said was a joke, something not to be taken seriously. I wonder, if Obama ever gets to read this article, what he has to say about that statement, because it is a load of sh*t. Dumbass comments like this get under my skin. She’s not gonna vote for him, to “protect him”? WTF!? Obama’s a grown ass man; he doesn’t need to be “protected” from anything. After 200-something years we finally have a black(-ish)person who has a shot as becoming prez, and n*ggas want to shoot hime down with silly statements like that.

    GTFOH. SMH.

    Obama ’08.

  • May

    Here’s an old black lady named Miss Clara (I wonder if she’s also a psychic) on how she plans to save Barack Obama’s life by not voting for him:

    “I fear that they just would kill him, that he wouldn’t even have a chance,” she said as she styled a customer’s hair with a curling iron. One way to protect him, she suggested, would be not to vote for him.

    ^^^^Didn’t Chris Rock make a joke out of this sometime in the past? That’s all it was though, a joke. It wasn’t made to be taken seriously. What this woman said here was a load of sh*t. Dumb ass comments like this get under my skin. She’s not going to vote for him to “protect him”? Obama is a grown-ass man; he doesn’t need to be “protected”. After 200-something-odd years we finally have a black(-ish) person who has a shot at becoming prez, and n*ggas is being detractors? WTF is that about!?

    *sucks teeth* GTFOH.

    Obama ’08, b*tches.

  • May

    Bol, tell me if I’m reading into your drop too much, but I think you’re also indirectly trying to say that women aren’t really the best informed when it comes to political issues.

    Am I right?

  • May

    One of the women (or was it the group of women?) said:

    “A man is supposed to be the head,” she said. “I feel like the Lord has put man first, and I believe in the Bible.”

    *groans, rolls eyes, and bangs head against a wall*

  • http://xxlmag.com Bol

    >One of the women (or was it the group of women?) said:

    “A man is supposed to be the head,” she said. “I feel like the Lord has put man first, and I believe in the Bible.”

    That part I actually agreed with!

    • EReal

      Me Too!

  • http://www.theunderwriters.blogspot.com THE UNDERWRITER

    *Daps LowEndofDaChi

    Yo, the real question is who really cares besides us. As far as “we” the underculture are concerned.

    Nobody.

    It ain’t gonna stop until a larger percentage of us can not only get up, hit the green and some coffee, and actually vote for those federally-excused vacation hours we get on election day. And then we’d have to actually go the extra mile of making sure our votes were properly counted, because our ancestors died for the right. Or maybe we’re just too embalmed by the Patron.

    Then we’d have to lose our religion and make some type of statement saying that Jesse doesn’t speak for us anymore. Neither does Al sometimes, even though I can agree with him and Dr. West on most issues. Tell the truth, I’d rather have Cornell and Colin on my team that both of the other two. Then you’d have the ill minds of both peace and war, both from a black perspective.

    Who the fuck am I kidding. Y’all ain’t voting, and I’m not trying to get on that “Vote or Die” b.s. anyway…

  • Carolina Live 101

    FUCK BOL. Very offensive to somebody from South Carolina. You niggas ain’t never seen a struggle in your fucking life mane. Seeing confederate flags all day.. Nigga I’m from where the civil war started. Where they still have the place where MOST of you so called niggas is from. Charleston. Where 68% of your ancestors come from. They were auctioned there mane. So to see this b.s. put about South Carolina, to go thru racism your whole fucking life.. I bet none of you so called hip hoppers from everywhere but the south EVER even been called a Nigger in your life. This shit is very degrading to the southern culture. You mufuckas make me sick with all this south hating shit……

    If I ever would see you, I’ll break your fucking fingers for even typing that bullshit.

  • bob

    hey!!!!!!!11

  • JAYSTONE

    who give a shit about poltics.my brothers go get your money…………………………….

    • Fire

      Are you serious? So don’t care about the future, what it can come to, or who may represent you and our country, just get money in the present? Real smart.

  • sbabyface in SC

    Contrary to your unintelligent statements, not everybody in South Carolina has the same opinions as these “old black ladies”. These statements only show the opinions of “old black ladies”, no matter where they reside, in the south or the north.

    Go to New York. Go to Delaware. Go to California. Speak to the “old black ladies” in those beauty salons and report on that. Let’s see if their opinions are any different. Dummy, those ladies were alive when all that stuff happened. Ofcourse, after not seeing a change their whole lives, they don’t believe it can happen now. They cried when Martin Luther King died and when JFK died. They don’t want that. It’s not South Carolina, dummy. It’s the older generation. Get a CLUE!

  • SIP

    BOL, WHO DO YOU WANT TO BE PRESIDENT

    I THINK IT SHOULD BE 50