Rick Ross Amazed At How Handsome He Looks In Recent Acting Role

Today, Rick Ross and his MMG labelmates release their third compilation project, Self Made Vol. 3. In a recent interview with The Associated Press, the Miami MC opened up about his relationship with Reebook, stating he still supports the sneaker brand and their initiatives.

“I’m still supporting Reebok. I’m still wearing Reebok,” he said. “It’s nothing more than that. I’ve been wearing Reebok my whole life. …Still got nothing but love for Reebok.”

Ross also touched on his acting career (he’s recently appeared on the Starz drama Magic City) and expectations for Self Made 3. Read a few excerpts from their Q&A below.

What did you learn from your setback with Reebok?

You live and you learn. I think the most unfortunate thing about the whole situation was just the fact that my lyrics offended some ladies, especially dealing with the topic of rape. It was interpreted as rape. I really wanted to make sure that I apologize to any woman that I offended in that way. I just wanted to make that clear. When I make music and I’m talking on records, it’s like I’m painting a picture. In my mind, I’m seeing a film. I apologize.

This is your label’s third compilation album and it mainly features you, Wale and Meek Mill. Why do you think it’s beneficial to release a compilation album?

When you see compilations like this, you see longevity. With us, we have people who are on top of their game. But we want to bring more artists into the fold, and give young artists an opportunity to be on the same playing field with us. That in itself speaks volumes to someone at home chasing their dreams.

What was going through your mind when you first saw yourself on Magic City as the character Butterball?

Honestly, when I saw myself come out from around that corner, I was really amazed by how handsome I looked. It’s like I got to see myself outside of seeing myself. I said to myself, `Wow, that’s an attractive (expletive) there. Not to mention, he’s rich.’ I just kind of laughed at myself. All the calls I had coming in, everybody was (messing) with me, picking at me and saying how I charged out to the car. They said I was talking like I was not me. I told them, `So what … I’m a boss.’

[via AP]