Stevie J Remembers His Greatest Hits


Puff Daddy ft. Busta Rhymes and The Notorious B.I.G. “Victory,” No Way Out (1997)

Well, actually I was listenin’ to the Rocky soundtrack. And, as I heard those horns, I was like, “Oh my God.” It’s about to be, “Houston, we have a problem.” At that point, the energy around Bad Boy was already so high. Those horns definitely symbolize some type of victory. When I jacked those joints, cut the three different parts of it, or four different parts of it up…I mean, when Big heard that joint, when Puff heard that joint, when Busta heard that joint. It had its own magic. That sample is definitely magical.

Puff Daddy ft. Carl Thomas, Ginuwine and Twista “Is This the End,” No Way Out (1997)

I did a lot of work before I got with Puff with Missy, Timbaland, Static—God bless the dead—Playa, Ginuwine. That sounded like a Timbaland joint to me. So, he rubbed off on me. Puff was tellin’ me he needed somethin’ fly. What I did was I took the stutter kick that Timbaland used to use, [mimics stutter drum] . It created a little different sound with the sounds that I used, the guitar, the mandolin. That was just a fun record. I give a little credit to Timbaland on that one right there. I took a couple of pages out his book. Great producer.

Puff Daddy ft. Foxy Brown “Friends,” No Way Out (1997)

Once again in the midi room in Daddy’s House studio, creating, taking those samples and just wanted to use them like nobody else has used them. I remember Puff bringing me that joint. And he was like, “What do you think about Foxy on that joint?” I’m like, “Perfect, yo.” That all worked out perfectly. Took the sample, cut it up, played over the sample and had it ready for Foxy in an hour.

Puff Daddy ft. Faith Evans and 112 “I’ll Be Missing You,” Life After Death (1997)

Puff and myself, we were listenin’ to—sad to say after our brother’s demise—we were in the studio listenin’ to records with candles lit, Puff, myself, 112, Faith Evans, D. Dot, it was a bunch of us. When that record came on, everybody looked at each other like, “Wow.” Everybody left the room. I chopped it up, played all the elements over on the guitar, the keys, added the bassline and we were ready to jump on it. 112, Faith and Puff and myself sat in the room and made a classic along with Sauce Money. Everybody knows Sauce’s pen game is mean. The way he colors and paints the picture on the painting, he does it like Picasso. It was only right on a record like that, you need a Picasso painted, you need that paintbrush on a record like that. I believe it was an excellent decision from Puff to reach out to Sauce Money.

Jay-Z “Ride or Die,” Hard Knock Life, Vol. 2 (1998)

I didn’t find out that [Jay-Z] was gonna diss Ma$e on it until Puff come walking in on my session, like, “Yo, I need to talk to you.” You know, with the look that he had, I was like, “Damn, I did somethin’ and shit?” We go in the vocal booth, he’s like, “Yo, you know, the Jay-Z record you did, he’s talkin’ about Ma$e.” I’m like, “No. I didn’t know nothin’ about it. All I know is he gave me 50 grand.” Me and Ma$e was in the same building. We were in the Hit Factory, so I went to Ma$e like, “I didn’t know.” I wouldn’t be part of no fuckery against the brotherhood. I had to make sure everything was cool with Ma$e. I had no knowledge that it was gonna go down like that. I wouldn’t have been on no bullshit like that. [I told Jay-Z] come on, you can’t throw me in no beef like that, especially when I’m producin’ the record for you and [you’re dissing] Ma$e. But you know, what’s done is done.

Eve ft. Gwen Stefani “Blow Your Mind,” Scorpion (2001)

I had no parts in making the beat, but on the writing side, on the hook and the verse. [My] Pen game [is] crazy. Gwen was not there. It was me, Dr. Dre, Scott Storch, Mike Elizondo and Eve in the studio. It was bananas and it was great to be in the studio with Dr. Dre and Eve.