XXL Presents… Mobb Deep’s 50 Greatest Songs

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    <em>XXL Presents</em>... Mobb Deep's 50 Greatest Songs
    Did they break up? Have they made up? Your guess is as good as <em>XXL</em>'s after a week that's been both confusing and disheartening in regards to the status of the Infamous Mobb Deep. But whatever the future may hold for the Queens duo, their legacy is already cemented as one of rap's greatest tag teams of all time. And on that note, <em>XXL</em> Presents... Mobb Deep's 50 Greatest Songs.—<em>XXL Staff</em>
  • 50. “Dog Shit” ft. Nas (2011)
    50. “Dog Shit” ft. Nas (2011)
    One of Mobb’s first releases since Prodigy’s release from Rikers Island, this single shows that the group’s three-and-a-half year hiatus has done little to affect their chemistry. Longtime collaborator Nas plays anchor, adding to his lengthy collection of stellar guest verses on Mobb tracks. “I chill like the cold side of the moon/Silence you dudes like an empty room,” he spits. Yet again, Prodigy, Havoc and haunting keys—this time provided by Alchemist—prove to be a winning recipe. <object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/exwhUGaw1pY?version=3&hl=en_US"/><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"/><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"/><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/exwhUGaw1pY?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"/></object>
  • 49. "Throw Your Hands (In The Air)
    49. "Throw Your Hands (In The Air) ,<em>Amerikaz Nightmare</em>(2004)
    “Throw Your Hands (In the Air)” is the third single from <em>Amerikaz Nightmare</em>, Mobb Deep’s sixth studio album. The track was produced by Kanye West, who sampled the Cold Crush Brothers’ “Live in Connecticut” and Love’s “Doggone” on it. ’Ye even gets a shout out at the top of the song for creating the catchy beat.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/7y7MuG-X6KQ?version=3&hl=en_US"/><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"/><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"/><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/7y7MuG-X6KQ?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"/></object>
  • 48. "Where Ya From" <em> Murda Muzik</em> 1999
    48. "Where Ya From" <em> Murda Muzik</em> (1999)
    “Where Ya From” is the ninth track on M-O-B-B’s <em>Murda Muzik</em> LP and is produced by T-Mix. The song features a guest verse from legendary rapper 8 Ball. Although it wasn’t released as a single, “Where Ya From” immediately became a fan-favorite after appearing on the album and marked one of the very first times a New York hip-hop act collaborated with a Southern one.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/xSz-zerVuLM?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/xSz-zerVuLM?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 47. "Backwards" <em> Backwards 12'</em> 2003
    47. "Backwards" <em> Backwards 12'</em>(2003)
    Though this record was meant to be apart of 1st Infantry, it forever remained as a 12-inch sleeper release. Mixing and matching segments off the sample (Toshiyuki Honda’s “Thunder Kiss”), Al masterfully demonstrates an illusion that the beat’s main loop is a rewinding sound effect of the intro. Lyrically, it’s nothing less than typical Mobb Deep, with “backwards” alluding to pushing caps with gun claps, than per se telling a story backwards. <object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/t1s7bAXYUwc?version=3&hl=en_US"/><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"/><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"/><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/t1s7bAXYUwc?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"/></object>
  • 46. "Man Down" <em>Hell On Earth</em> (1996)
    46. "Man Down" <em>Hell On Earth</em> (1996)
    The Infamous team kick that thug shit to the maximum on the gritty "Man Down." P sets the tone immediately when he opens with, "Here come the vultures, the Mobb-laced potent rap shit...My nigga's laughing, blood bathin, the world's greatest/In-famous crime-zanous."<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/TGtCs8ICdy0?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/TGtCs8ICdy0?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 45. "Nobody Likes Me" <em> Violators: The Album</em> 1999
    45. "Nobody Likes Me" <em> Violators: The Album</em> (1999)
    A line like, “Nobody likes me, everybody hates me, so I got to pack my gun” wouldn’t sit well with Washington’s policy makers (or anyone for that matter), but it certainly works for P and Hav as they decreed on this track for the Violator: The Album. With their usual anecdotal references and haughty hubris of gun threats against rappers, drug dealers, and haters, the upbeat anthem with a (very) cynical theme, reassures Mobb Deep’s then perspective on street survival and rap politics.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/aQt6ulmW1J0?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/aQt6ulmW1J0?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 44. "Everyday Gunplay" <em>The Infamous Archives</em> 2007
    44. "Everyday Gunplay" <em>The Infamous Archives</em> (2007)
    Hav and Prodigy get into stick up storytelling mode on this hidden gem off The Infamous Archives album.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/RWO8QPuidT8?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/RWO8QPuidT8?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 43. "Put Em In Their Place," <em>Blood Money</em> 2006
    43. "Put Em In Their Place," <em>Blood Money</em>(2006)
    After receiving the G-Unit stamp, P and Hav readied their <em>Blood Money</em> LP release with this rowdy single that peaked no. 59 on <em>Billboard</em>'s Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Singles & Tracks chart. Despite the album being warmly received, the Mobb had one heck of a banger with the first single.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/Co63sm3lgKM?version=3&hl=en_US"/><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"/><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"/><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/Co63sm3lgKM?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"/></object>
  • 42. "Waterboarding" <em>Black Cocaine </em>2011
    42. "Waterboarding" <em>Black Cocaine </em>(2011)
    Fresh off prison, Prodigy went straight back into the lab, churning out a series of new materials. His collaborative effort with the Alchemist persisted, along with Havoc’s rekindled interest to spit that raw. The frightening concept of waterboarding, reflected on the menacing claim of torturing weak rappers, is classic Mobb Deep its fans have awaited for years.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/4l3HqpLMJFk?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/4l3HqpLMJFk?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 40. "Nighttime Vultures" <em>Hell On Earth</em> 1996
    40. "Nighttime Vultures" <em>Hell On Earth</em>(1996)
    P and Havoc impress as well, but The Chef absolutely MURDERS his verse on this banger off of <em> Hell On Earth</em><object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/2TBXbOPIeGU?version=3&hl=en_US"/><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"/><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"/><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/2TBXbOPIeGU?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"/></object>
  • 39. "Double Shots" <em>Free Agents: The Murda Mixtape</em> 2003
    39. "Double Shots" <em>Free Agents: The Murda Mixtape</em> (2003)
    Cheers to this party banger from 2003's <em> Murda Mixtape </em>. Havoc whipped up a looped disco sample for this feel good club jam. <object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/6Hukurl9DAs?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/6Hukurl9DAs?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 38. "Clap" <em> Infamy </em> 2001
    38. "Clap" <em> Infamy </em>(2001)
    <em> Infamy </em> 's gotta be Mobb Deep's most underrated album Hav snaps on his verse here and comes correct behind the boards as well. <object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/s8ayQNjZTGc?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/s8ayQNjZTGc?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 37. "Get At Me" <em>Infamy</em> 2001
    37. "Get At Me" <em>Infamy</em> (2001)
    Aside from the popular singles, the Alchemist-produced “Get At Me,” stands out as one of the Infamy’s most cinematic and belligerent cuts. Recycling his own lines from “Quiet Storm (Remix)” as the hook, Hav questions the doubters and answers them with threats, while Prodigy warningly does the same.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/2uZG8K5ZU6I?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/2uZG8K5ZU6I?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 36. “Win Or Lose,” Amerikaz Nightmare, 2004
    36. “Win Or Lose,” <em>Amerikaz Nightmare</em> (2004)
    One feels good, the other sucks. The Infamous Mobb Deep breaks both down over this smooth, easy-on-the-ears beat.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/u3koWXFTKws?version=3&hl=en_US"/><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"/><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"/><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/u3koWXFTKws?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"/></object>
  • 35. "Crawlin" <em> Infamy </em> 2001
    35. "Crawlin" <em>Infamy </em> (2001)
    The Mobb makes their enemies cling for life on this not so subtle warning track. “Without a doubt, you gonna hear that thing clap,” promises Hav as the sample rings under him. P takes the opportunity to address Jay-Z’s famous Summer Jam diss, “You a homo rapper, H-to-the-You know,” he jokes before speaking on Jay’s ballerina picture stunt. “I set it off on your bitch ass, don’t forget that/And your retaliation was weak: baby pictures?”<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/J0qKr7rvhv8?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/J0qKr7rvhv8?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 34. "Adrenaline" <em>Murda Muzik</em>1999
    34. "Adrenaline" <em>Murda Muzik</em>(1999)
    A stream-of-conscious boasts laid out back-to-back by Havoc and Prodigy are at its finest in this Murda Muzik album cut. “Adrenaline,” though it’s a less celebrated banger from the LP, summarizes the thuns’ mental notes in a simplistic hook: “It be the guns, money, pussy, cars, drugs, jewels, clothes, brawls, killings, boroughs, buildings, disease, stress, in these N.Y.C.”<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/iM7MbrqUJ-w?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/iM7MbrqUJ-w?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 33. "U.S.A. (Aight Then) <em>Murda Muzik</em> 1999
    33. "U.S.A. (Aight Then) <em>Murda Muzik</em> (1999)
    “U.S.A. (Aight Then)” is the fourth and final single from MB’s <em>Murda Muzik</em>, the duo’s fourth studio album. Epitome Shamello Buddah produced the track, which peaked at No. 36 on the Billboard Hot Rap Tracks and features the song “Spread Love” on the b-side. The tune was originally titled “Street Kingz” and featured a verse by Nas.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/gtkR5SnhOfU?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/gtkR5SnhOfU?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 32. "Thug Muzik" <em> Murda Muzik</em> 1999
    32. "Thug Muzik" <em> Murda Muzik</em> (1999)
    Thanks to his mentor, DJ Muggs of Cypress Hill, The Alchemist went from a Whooliganz alumnus, providing beats for the likes of Dilated Peoples and High & Mighty, to working with the thun’d-out Queens collective. Everything from content, chorus, to the ominous sample is diced into a boiling pot creating the thug anthem of ‘99. Not a bad way to spark a long-standing partnership between Beverly Hills and QB.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/fXk6qxwzhF4?version=3&hl=en_US"/><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"/><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"/><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/fXk6qxwzhF4?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"/></object>
  • 31. "Allustrious"<em>Murda Muzik</em>1999
    31. "Allustrious"<em>Murda Muzik</em>(1999)
    P occasionally put his gun down to flex his lyrical muscle on weaker MCs. This is such an example. “How dare you entertain the thought/That you could come out to challenge me in blood talk?,” reasons P, well aware that he’s become a tough talk extraordinaire. The song would later be sampled on Mos Def's "Rock & Roll" and Common's " The Sixth Sense."<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/CkkoGHlY_Mc?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/CkkoGHlY_Mc?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 30. "Got It Twisted" <em>Amerikaz Nightmare</em> (2004)
    30. "Got It Twisted" <em>Amerikaz Nightmare</em> (2004)
    Prodigy and Havoc came through with record that blazed both the clubs and streets with 2004's "Got It Twisted." The boisterous yet hypnotizing lead single off <em>Amerikaz Nightmare</em> landed at number 18 on <em>Billboard</em>'s Hot Rap Tracks and 64 on the Hot 100, proving to be another successful record for the Mobb. Still got it twisted?<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/hTGr-hCTRz8?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/hTGr-hCTRz8?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 29. Get Dealt With,” <em>Hell on Earth</em> (1996)
    29. Get Dealt With,” <em>Hell on Earth</em> (1996)
    This track shows another facet of Mobb's blood talk. The duo became hardcore rap poster children primarily for chronicling the survival of the fittest o the street life in their beloved Queens, but the intent is much more premeditated, here. Mobb lives up to its moniker, as associates assemble to eliminate a threat. “Harms break em down, rapper Noyd cut his throat/Don swoop em up or Gotti stomp em out/Each twin grab a arm, pick this nigga up/Knitty turn his face to me, let me break him up,” P rhymes. Mobb Deep indeed. <object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/i9oaWkwnkmg?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/i9oaWkwnkmg?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 28. Where Ya Heart At
    28. "Where Ya Heart At" <em> Murda Muzik</em> 1999
    “Ayo it’s hell on earth here, the pavement’s scorching,” begins Havoc on this standout from 1999’s Murda Muzik. He and P go on to reflect on matters close to the heart on this somber tune that also showed up on the soundtrack to In Too Deep, a 1999 thriller starring LL Cool J and Omar Epps.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/-KpUPo3dKII?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/-KpUPo3dKII?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 27. “Get Away,” Infamy, 2002
    27. “Get Away” <em>Infamy</em> 2001
    Sometimes it’s good to just get away, but the M-O-B-B remains as Queensbridge as it gets. Prodigy and Havoc still…Queens nigga, grimy retarded.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/PNzNwWM8pBI?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/PNzNwWM8pBI?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 26. “Pearly Gates,” Blood Money, 2006
    26. “Pearly Gates,” <em>Blood Money</em> 2006
    With the big assist from 50 Cent, Havoc and Prodigy question religion, P even blasphemously stating, “Now homie if I go to hell and you make it to the pearly gates/tell the boss man we got beef” and later, “We don’t give a fuck about that religious bullshit.” Damn, P, tell ’em why you mad, son! Tell ’em why you mad!<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/TmkcobEpqjA?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/TmkcobEpqjA?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 25. "Murda Muzik" <em> Murda Muzik</em> 1999
    25. "Murda Muzik" <em> Murda Muzik</em> 1999
    Over a thumping bass line Mobb and Hav go hard, with P taunting the competition rapping "Ya projects is on our dicks, you need to quit and let us rep that for them, your raps ain't shit!
  • 24. "Animal Instinct" <em>Hell On Earth</em>1996
    24. "Animal Instinct" <em>Hell On Earth</em>1996
    At the time of its release, Mobb Deep’s third effort, Hell On Earth, couldn’t help but get compared to its critically lauded predecessor, The Infamous. Havoc’s maturity as a producer and Prodigy’s dexterity as a lyricist, however, were undeniably strong to be shunned. The album’s entrance was none other than “Animal Instinct,” where Hav masterfully loops a tiny intro portion of The Trammps’s “That’s Where the Happy People Go,” and accents it with head-snapping boom bap drums. Fighting words displayed by the always-baleful P and Hav, accompanied by the then newcomers Twin Gambino and Ty Nitty of the Infamous Mobb, make this recording a sinister, yet triumphant intro to one of the duo’s greatest albums.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/98yfcXhKKK4?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/98yfcXhKKK4?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 23. "Extortion" <em>Hell On Earth</em> 1996
    23. "Extortion" <em>Hell On Earth</em> 1996
    Featuring Method Man, “Extortion” appeared on the the Mobb’s third album, <em>Hell on Earth</em> and, while not released as a single, instantly became a hit in its own right mainly because on of the sampling of the Jackson 5’s “Can You Remember” on the production (which is credited to duo itself).<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/4luDbptVoh8?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/4luDbptVoh8?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 22. "Cobra" <em>The Infamous Archives</em> 2007
    22. "Cobra" <em>The Infamous Archives</em> 2007
    Just when we thought it was over, the Mobb came back with the dark claustrophobic shit talking banger, “Cobra.” “Yo dunn, they wish they can have talent like this. We do our own beats, and we write our own shit,” P boasts. Can’t argue with that.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/jBWNA_D5AU4?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/jBWNA_D5AU4?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 21. "Back At You" <em>Sunset Park Soundtrack</em> 1996
    21. "Back At You" <em>Sunset Park Soundtrack</em> 1996
    Off the soundtrack to the 1996 basketball drama, <em>Sunset Park</em>, Hav and P kick knowledge on this 90's classic<object width="420" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/rkV6SCOIrnM?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/rkV6SCOIrnM?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="420" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 20. "Q.U. Hectic" <em> The Infamous </em> 1995
    20. "Q.U. Hectic" <em> The Infamous </em> 1995
    On this ode to their native stomping ground, Mobb Deep paint a hectic picture of Queens indeed, with Havoc scaring citizens into using infants as human shields and P’s dark revelations. “Everything is real inside my mind, these days. You can’t make it if you ain’t affiliated with crime.”<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/Fsrg0EmU3MA?version=3&hl=en_US"/><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"/><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"/><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/Fsrg0EmU3MA?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"/></object>
  • 19. “The Start of Your Ending (41st Side),” <em>The Infamous</em> (1995)
    19. “The Start of Your Ending (41st Side),” <em>The Infamous</em> (1995)
    The opener to Mobb’s sophomore masterpiece, this Havoc-produced number encapsulates the Queens duo’s growth from gimmicky teens to menacing younglyricists. Now equipped with a grittier voice, Prodigy begins carvingthe legend of the chilling wordsmith he’s become over the years. “Webustin’ caps none stop blazin’ in all the shows/And even at the hoes,” P warns. Run for cover.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/Yb_jG-hasSY?version=3&hl=en_US"/><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"/><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"/><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/Yb_jG-hasSY?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"/></object>
  • 18. "Trife Life" <em> The Infamous</em> 1995
    18. "Trife Life" <em> The Infamous</em> 1995
    Hav and P discover they've being set up in this plotting narrative in which they confront rival crews in the faraway land of Brooklyn. <object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/PFVseEeuHKM?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/PFVseEeuHKM?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 17. "What's Ya Poison" <em> Murda Muzik</em> 1999
    17. "What's Ya Poison" <em> Murda Muzik</em> 1999
    This Cormega-assisted heatrock from Mobb Deep’s Murda Muzik is yet another freestyle-friendly instrumental pieced by Havoc. With its dark piano keys dribbling across the board—illustrating a mental picture of crime, murder, and drugs—the three Queensbridge reps mourn the dead, open up about fear, while dreadfully elucidate detailed murder plots. Now ask yourself how you want it? Bent scheme or straight blunted?<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/fRfkZVr-WoY?version=3&hl=en_US"/><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"/><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"/><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/fRfkZVr-WoY?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"/></object>
  • 16. "Up North Trip" <em>The Infamous</em> 1995
    16. "Up North Trip" <em>The Infamous</em> 1995
    Although “Shook Ones” and “Survival of the Fittest” were released as singles and immediately won MB fans over upon dropping, it was the quiet banger “Up North Trip” that stood out to many on the group’s sohomore album. Produced by Havoc, the track sampled classic tracks like "To Be With You" by The Fatback Band and “I’m Tired of Giving” by The Spinners.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/lMl_1DEX9GA?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/lMl_1DEX9GA?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" </object></embed></object>
  • 15. "The Realest" <em> Murda Muzik</em> 1999
    15. "The Realest" <em> Murda Muzik</em> 1999
    On the hook, Kool G Rap and Prodigy trade a list of street etiquettes and proclaim the manifesto of what’s “real.” The solemn loop laid by the Alchemist, plays a fitting canvas to Havoc’s mournful shout out to those deceased (including his brother, Killer Black), while G Rap and P make gun threats that’ll leave domes split, respectively.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/hRJrES7bNSg?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/hRJrES7bNSg?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 14. “Temperature Rising,” <em>The Infamous</em> (1995)
    14. “Temperature Rising,” <em>The Infamous</em> (1995)
    Hav and P take a page off Nas’s book and pen a letter to thenincarcerated friend—who also happens to be Havoc’s older brother—Killa Black. Serving as <em>The Infamous</em>’s third single, the song didn’t make much of a dent on the chart, but has long been a fanfavorite. KB would later die and be eulogized across a number of Mobbsongs.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/KdF8wEfP6MQ?version=3&hl=en_US"/><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"/><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"/><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/KdF8wEfP6MQ?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"/></object>
  • 13. "Right Back At You" <em>The Infamous</em> 1995
    13. "Right Back At You" <em>The Infamous</em> 1995
    Raekwon, Ghostface Killah, and Big Noyd hop on this classic off The Infamous where P expresses no regard for the life of others or himself threatening “Run for your life or you wanna get your heat, whatever. We can die together. As long as I send your maggot ass to the essence, I don’t give a fuck about my presence.”<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/gDe6UxghxKA?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/gDe6UxghxKA?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 12. “G.O.D. Pt III,” <em>Hell on Earth</em> (1996)
    12. “G.O.D. Pt III,” <em>Hell on Earth</em> (1996)
    The third single off Mobb’s third solo LP, “G.O.D. Pt. III” failed to crack the <em>Billboard</em> Hot 100, but it’s a reminder of a pre-shiny suit era where contrived music wasn’t an option just yet. Mobb’s <em>Hell on Earth </em> was certified gold—partly due to a trilogy of singles that today’s A&Rs would have turned into album cuts. <object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/jrtGdWuhRmw?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/jrtGdWuhRmw?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 11. "Quiet Storm," <em>Murda Muzik</em> (1999)
    11. "Quiet Storm," <em>Murda Muzik</em> (1999)
    Arguably one of P and Hav's mammoth street anthems, "Quiet Storm" peaked at no. 17 on <em>Billboard</em>'s Hot Rap Singles in 1999. The gully joint found the Infamous duo brandishing their crime-rhyme for the duns and adding another classic to their catalog.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/M0gYFrWF6UE?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/M0gYFrWF6UE?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 10. The Learning (Burn)
    10. "The Learning (Burn)" <em>Infamy</em> 2001
    A rumored subliminal at Jay-Z, P’s verse is one of the most vicious of his career. “I bring it to the best of them/From the old to the new to the rest of em,” he spits over the abrasive beat. Add in solid verses from Havoc, Big Noyd and Vita (yes, that Vita) and you’ve got a certified QB classic.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/rM9eaRfnTa8?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/rM9eaRfnTa8?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 9. “Drop a Gem on ‘Em,” <em>Hell on Earth</em> (1996)
    9. “Drop a Gem on ‘Em,” <em>Hell on Earth</em> (1996)
    Prodigy was dead serious when he warned that he doesn’t back down easy on <em>The Infamous</em>’s “The Infamous Prelude.” It turns out the same goes for Havoc. With coastal feuds nearing its peak, Mobb stepped to the plate and responded to 2Pac’s jabs on the scathing “Hit ‘Em Up.” The song was recorded when ‘Pac was alive, but released shortly after his death. “My rebellion retaliate/I had the whole New York state/Aimin’ at your face at the gate,” Prodigy rhymes. Though controversial at the time of its release, it’s considered one of the greatest diss songs of all time 16 years later.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/5ACMDW42eOI?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/5ACMDW42eOI?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 8. "It's Mine" ft. Nas, <em>Murda Muzik</em> (1999)
    8. "It's Mine" ft. Nas, <em>Murda Muzik</em> (1999)
    The Mobb and Nas on one track, what's better than that? The trio came and delivered with their signature lethal realism on the single single to 1999's punishing <em>Murda Muzik</em> LP.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/rDdPcYaFH3k?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/rDdPcYaFH3k?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 7. “Drink Away the Pain,” ft. Q-Tip <em>The Infamous</em> (1995)
    7. “Drink Away the Pain,” ft. Q-Tip <em>The Infamous</em> (1995)
    The Mobb draws parallels between their tumultuous relationships between women and alcohol on this brilliant personified concept song. P plays the field—indulging in E&J and Tanqueray, while Havoc is clearly sprung with Hennessey. Q-Tip—who also produced the track—name-drops Tommy Hilfiger and Nautica, just to name a few brands, as characters in an elaborate heist tale. Tip’s verse is sandwiched between P, who’s playing the field—indulging in E&J and Tanqueray—while Havoc is clearly sprung with Hennessey.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/T_PANWkHTT8?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/T_PANWkHTT8?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 6. "Hell On Earth (Front Lines" <em>Hell On Earth</em>1996
    6. "Hell On Earth (Front Lines" <em>Hell On Earth</em>(1996)
    Along with “Shook Ones (Part II),” “Hell On Earth (Front Lines)” ranks in the upper echelon of tracks selected by both amateurs and professionals of rap as an essential instrumental to spit over. Plus, Prodigy makes sure to exhibit one of his toughest military-minded threats: “Test me? You must be bent, G. Don’t tempt me. I had this full clip for so long, it needs to empty.”<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/lIi7J1riB2w?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/lIi7J1riB2w?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 5. "Eye for a Eye" ft. Nas & Raekwon, <em>The Infamous</em> (1995)
    5. "Eye for a Eye" ft. Nas & Raekwon, <em>The Infamous</em> (1995)
    With all due respect to Chamillionaire, the sound of revenge was Mobb's over a decade before the Houston rapper was riding dirty. Retribution remains a favorite on the Queens duo's topical palette. But, this track arguably finds Hav and P at their best. Nas and Raekwon join in on the action. "Shaolin and Queensbridge, we rob nighas for fun," Rae nonchalantly quips. In this instance, revenge is a track best served cold. <object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/_XzGCUXm7p0?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/_XzGCUXm7p0?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 4. “Give Up the Goods (Just Step)” ft. Big Noyd, <em>The Infamous</em> (1995)
    4. “Give Up the Goods (Just Step)” ft. Big Noyd, <em>The Infamous</em> (1995)
    One of three Q-Tip produced tracks off <em>The Infamous</em>, this recklessly entertaining cut—the B-side to “Temperature’s Rising”—features some of Mobb’s all-time most famous lines. “For years I’ve been doin’ the same shit/Just drinkin’ liquor doin’ bids/Extortin’ crackheads and stickin’ up the stick up kids,” a diabolic P offers. But it’s Big Noyd who arguably steals the show, here. Though not exactly breaking ground lyrically, Rapper Noyd offers a memorable rhyme-along-ready verse. “Don’t make me buck ya/’Cause I’m a wild muthafucka/You know my flow, you know my steelo/Even pack a gat when I go to see my P.O.”<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/u-LB6jkCGog?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/u-LB6jkCGog?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 3. “Survival of the Fittest,” The Infamous, 1995
    3. “Survival of the Fittest,” <em>The Infamous</em>(1995)
    It’s hard to follow a song like “Shook Ones Pt. II,” the blueprint track for legions of hip-hop enthusiasts. Yet, the M-O-B-B did just that with “Survival of the Fittest,” the second single of The Infamous. There’s a war going on outside, no man is safe from. Talk to ’em, P!<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/i9ZykEJuFrI?version=3&hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/i9ZykEJuFrI?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
  • 2. Quiet Storm
    2. “Quiet Storm (Remix)” <em> Murda Muzik</em> (1999)
    The hook to this sinister banger was already gully enough on the original version. But when Lil Kim recites the immortal bars (“It’s the real shit, Shit to make you feel shit”) on the remix, the Queen Bee takes the term gangstress to another level. Havoc drops one of his most quotable verses and P brings it home with a verse that stabs harder than the track’s ominous piano keys.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/3d3TfbjJUEU?version=3&hl=en_US"/><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"/><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"/><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/3d3TfbjJUEU?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"/></object>
  • 1. Shook Ones Part II <em>The Infamous</em> 1995
    1. Shook Ones Part II <em>The Infamous</em> (1995)
    An instant classic. The lead single off of the The Infamous is not only the greatest Mobb Deep song of all time, but one of the greatest hip hop songs of all time, period. A graphic depiction of inner city struggle, Shook Ones Part II embodied everything that was New York 90’s rap music and was the defining record of Mobb Deep’s career.<object width="620" height="25"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/cP0wsET8__Y?version=3&hl=en_US"/><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"/><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"/><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/cP0wsET8__Y?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="25" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"/></object>
  • NAPTOWNNUISANCE

    I didnt know they actually had 50 songs worth calling great. They have always been a so so group to me. Mediocre.

    • http://www.themobbdeep.com YallBeBetterOffIfIWasDead

      You must be a youngster with comments like that. Guess you haven’t received yer hood pass yet. Dig a little deeper into the underground and you might just catch a glimpse of what a real hood pass looks like. So you’ll know to respect it next time you see it.

      • truth720

        dat lil nigga naptown don’t know, he musta been born in the mid 90′s or sumthing.let him be. i forgive him. da mobb hasn’t been da mobb we all knew since after infamy. fyi,the mobb is best duo dat ever done it! period! that’s consisting of 2 solo mc’s.eric B. and Rakim is one mc and a d.j, so that’s voided right thurr! Run-dmc is a trio, in all actuality. the only runner ups would be epmd, smif n wessun, cnn, m.o.p.,and heltah skeltah. the generic duos like ye and hov, em and royce,etc,.. are not official duos. the closest would be red n mef, or ghost n rae, and jada n stylz, but once again there’s technicalities.
        they’re not official duos.those m.o.b.b. dudes are legends bro!
        i can’t say i fucks wit dem like i used to, but i haven’t found anyone else yet, that has left an impact on hip hop , the hood, or me ever since then. if u find one,plz lemme know.

        • IKnowAboutMusic

          You are obviously from up north and have a bias as such. Mobb Deep is not close to the best duo. UGK kills them. 8 Ball & MJG kill them by farrrrr. And I would even take Red and Meth over them from the north. But then again, I am not from the hood or whatever garbage all you people are babbling about (thank god for me, the hood seems terrible). But, I do understand music. Now this being said, Quiet Storm is one of the best songs ever made. Just not nearly the best duo ever. And they definitely don’t have 50 “great” songs

          • sa

            ur an IDIOT if you think ugk,mjg and 8 ball kills em stfu and yes they do have 50 great songs just because you’re talentless doesn’t mean everyone else is

    • http://www.yahoo.com $W!Gbwoy

      next to Outkast, Mobb Deep is the best selling rap duo of all time niqqa! their 90s joints would annihilate n e bullshyt ud hear in todays’ generation & their material is strictly made for the hoods of the world.

    • NAPTOWNNUISANCE

      I got one better for all you dick riders, learn somethin about opinion, Im 37 and have been a fan of hip hop since the golden era of hip hop. Since shell toes and fat laces,

      Ive been a fan of everything from Big Daddy Kane Run DMC, the Beasties, Eric B and Rakim, to Biggie the Wu and the west coast movement of the death row era. Quit tryin to school someone who knows just as much about hip hop if not more than you.

      Me not liking them is an opinion and them bein great is not a fact its an opinion.

      I didnt care for them they was weak in my eyes. They had a couple good songs thats it.

      Get their balls out of your mouth and just chill…..

      • NAPTOWNNUISANCE

        Real talk

        • TruthBeTold

          man SHUT THE FUCK UP with that shit, their skill AINT OPINION, its fuckin fact you stupid piece of shit. Their one of the most talented duo’s in hip-hop history IF YOU KNEW YOUR FACTS. prove me wrong bro , PLEASE. All dudes make are classics while rappers you be listenin to make HOT TRACKS that ain’t nobody gone be listenin to once the next hot TRACK come out , an thats that. fuck your dumb , just kill yourself.

          • NAPTOWNNUISANCE

            Classics? Really? Then why is it no one ever mentions them in the same breath with some of the greatest except for some dumb ass dick ridin fans? They are garbage quit arguing with me over opinions. They dont have skill the have songs that got them by because they were slightly better than some of the average rappers out inn the east at their time.
            Everyone I listen to is considered great and legends, no one I know or any thing I ever read ever talk about them as being great. They are average. Sorry the truth hurts your butt.
            Dick riders SMDH, you would think you was on their payroll as badly as you defend these lames.

      • PopinAnTutnAllOverU

        lol. he named all radio rappers.

      • PopinAnTutnAllOverU

        and shell toes/fat laces didnt come out until years later in the rap game. Run DMC gave “show tells” their boost, and fat laces were even later. Run DMC and all those you named were NOT, the golden era. the golden era has been the whole time. your a blind fool. it sounds like you dont really know anything but radio stuff. the fact that you said “a couple” of good songs tells me that you didnt buy or listen to more than a few songs by them EVER, because that statement is just ignorant. your a stooge, flapping your lips because you can. if you said that shit around me, i would smack you like a bitch and DARE you to do something.

  • Tru Talk

    @NAPTOWNNUISANCE… lol learn something about rap

    • NAPTOWNNUISANCE

      Only on a website that supports garbage like Rick Ross,Lil Wayne and Waka and Drake would they post an article sayin that Mobb Deep is great. Goes to show you XXL lost it touch with hip hop.

      • PopinAnTutnAllOverU

        i agree. they dont need to be named shit for those of us who know. i just counted my 4 and 5 star rated ipod mobb, and i counted 35 songs. im missing a lot of cds by them. i have about 8 of them, and i think the unsigned one is a double? im inclined to believe that theres more than 50. i was into rap when the first rap song came out in 78 or 79. blondi, song called Rapture. Mobb is true, and the realest shit you ever heard. dudes better off shuttn the fuck up. Mobb taught me how to deal with idiots just like him. im on the west coast and i dont listen to this crap. i had trouble with fools at work, so i took my JVC(always)army green Kaboom box to work and played Mobb all FUCKIN day. they never gave me any problems after that. they never sold out to radio. i like that. even hard ones go soft. they set the hardness level to “high heels”. real rap is about real shit, and ryming, and being on time, flippin the script and just plain ole layin it down, about something thats true mostly.

  • JD

    “Ayo it’s hell on earth here, the pavement’s scorching,” begins Havoc” UM NO, IT’S PRODIGY THAT SAYS THAT

  • EB

    Where the fuck is apostle’s warning ? The remix of quiet storm better than the original ? … Shit is fucked up.

  • esbach

    MAKE UP TO $300 DAILY ON HIPHOP SITES-http://is.gd/worldstarwinner

    • IKnowAboutMusic

      You realize this kind of garbage SEO/Link Building does not work, right? And it has been proven that it rarely even drive significant traffic. Kill yourself or get on some serious White Hat SEO if you think you are good

  • Nas Qb

    Mobb deep have so many classic tracks you cant get them all but i think BUMP THAT should of made it on here although 50 cent did murder it so i always associate it with him

  • Tic706

    Dope list.

    Surprised Outta Control (remix) did not make it. I know it was originally a 50 song but the remix is credited to the Mobb.

  • Ltnec7

    I agree with this list mostly still couple tracks i rate aren’t there…
    “apostles warning” “still shinin” “heat is on- remix” “party ova”… These tracks are defo in top 10-20 for me.
    If you don’t like mobb deep it’s probs cos you ain’t heard their old stuff…
    If you have and still think so… U just ain’t into rap then cos this is rap at its finest!
    In tht case stik to ur talentless music of nowadays!!

    If u haven’t already check out “capone n noreaga’s” work…

  • http://xxl.com gljkadfj

    Outkast was the best duo not even pimp c can handle him and hes from my home town so mobb deep wasnt the realest I give that to DMX but outkast man crazy

  • Va 2up 2dwn

    Cme on stop playing the mobb had it on lock from the early nintys to 2000 no dick riding just kno my gangsta music

  • infamousforever

    Speakin’ So Freely, and Daydreamin’ of the Blood Money Lp were great tracks. “On the Run” from Americaz Nightmare. “Solidified”, “Paid In Full”, “Narcotic”, “Watch That Nigga”, “Burn Something”, from the FREE AGENTS mixtape. “Bounce”, “Hurt Niggas”, “I Won’t Fall”, “Nothing Like Home”, from the Infamy. “First Day of Spring”, “In the Long Run”, “Young Luv”, “Shit Hits the Fan”.

    The MOBB sound is only for a select few, real recognize real my nigs!!!!

  • Brad

    Pretty good list, but every song from The Infamous and Hell on Earth should be on there.

    How the hell can you leave off Still Shinin’, Give it up Fast, Party Over and Cradle to the Grave?